Reviews for How to babysit a grandma

School Library Journal
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PreS-Gr 2-In a companion to Reagan's How to Babysit a Grandpa (Knopf, 2012), a young girl heads over to her grandma's house for a sleepover babysitting session-with the child providing clear and humorous instructions to readers on how to care for a grandma. The to-do list contains many choices for Grandma to select from, including a walk to the park, reading, taking photos, playing dress-up, and adding sugary sprinkles to her meal items. The child wisely allows plenty of time for Grandma to look at the pages while reading a book, peek at the stars, and choose the best spot to sleep. Any grown-up who has calmly been the object of a child's flights of fancy will chuckle at the scenarios, as Grandma, never mugging or rolling her eyes, participates fully and patiently in all of her granddaughter's ideas. The full-color digital art is bright, and sharp-eyed children will delight in the details, including the silly antics of Grandma's dog. While this book breaks no new ground, the charm of its premise and the clear bond between the generations will have kids and grandparents giggling together.-Marge Loch-Wouters, La Crosse Public Library, WI (c) Copyright 2014. Library Journals LLC, a wholly owned subsidiary of Media Source, Inc. No redistribution permitted.


Publishers Weekly
(c) Copyright PWxyz, LLC. All rights reserved

Reagan and Wildish follow their bestselling How to Babysit a Grandpa with another sly how-to that guides readers through the finer points of babysitting one's grandparent. The narrator offers suggestion after suggestion for how to make a sleepover at grandma's go off without a hitch, from visiting the park to having singalongs, reading, and watching for the first star at night. Wildish's cheery digital illustrations smooth over any potential moments of anxiety (such as when "grandma" might be "missing your mom and dad" at night) with lots of soft smiles and evidence of the close bond between this grandmother and granddaughter. Ages 5-8. Author's agent: Jamie Weiss Chilton, Andrea Brown Literary Agency. Illustrator's agent: Vicki Willden-Lebrecht, the Bright Agency. (Mar.) (c) Copyright PWxyz, LLC. All rights reserved.


Book list
From Booklist, Copyright © American Library Association. Used with permission.

In this companion to How to Babysit a Grandpa (2012), Reagan offers a fun, relatable story about the qualities of being a good babysitter, told from the perspective of a little girl who is spending quality time with her grandmother. From the illustrations, which resemble Polaroid snapshots of their visit together, to the many checklists that the little girl jots down, such as How to Keep Grandma Busy and How to Say Good-Bye to Grandma, the story celebrates family connections and successful babysitting experiences. The how-to format, which Reagan highlights in the narrator's bubbly handwriting, creates a lively framework, but it's the bright, energetic mixed-media illustrations that convey the action and create the sense of story and character. Particularly clear in an evening scene as the girl and her grandma observe the stars in the purplish night sky, the mood of kindness, love, and togetherness comes through on every page.--Miller, Annie Copyright 2014 Booklist


Horn Book
(c) Copyright The Horn Book, Inc., a wholly owned subsidiary of Media Source, Inc. No redistribution permitted.

In a follow-up to How to Babysit a Grandpa, a girl imagines how she'll be a good grandma babysitter at their sleepover: they'll go to the park, sing songs, and tell stories; if Grandma misses Mom and Dad, the girl will remind her, "They'll be here tomorrow..." Bright digital illustrations add lots of amusing details and showcase the warm, caring intergenerational relationship. (c) Copyright 2014. The Horn Book, Inc., a wholly owned subsidiary of Media Source, Inc. No redistribution permitted.

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