Reviews for Blood And Treasure

by Bob Drury and Tom Clavin

Publishers Weekly
(c) Copyright PWxyz, LLC. All rights reserved

Clavin and Drury return (after Valley Forge) with an enlightening biography of Daniel Boone set against the backdrop of 18th-century America’s conflicts with England and Native tribes. Born in 1734 to English immigrants in Pennsylvania, Boone was drawn “to the backcountry’s contours and creatures,” and became a proficient hunter at a young age. As a husband and father, Boone’s restlessness and need for adventure caused him to relocate his family several times, and in 1773 he led a group of colonists in the first attempt to establish a British settlement in present-day Kentucky. The immigrants met with fierce resistance from the Shawnee and other local tribes; Boone’s 16-year-old son, James, was killed in an ambush. Clavin and Drury detail numerous atrocities committed by colonists and Natives during the settling of Kentucky and describe how Boone rescued his kidnapped daughter and her two friends from a Shawnee camp in 1776. The authors also pay close attention to Boone’s June 1778 escape from the Shawnee after months of captivity; his four-day, 160-mile journey to warn his namesake settlement, Boonesborough, of an impending attack; and successful leadership of the outpost’s defenses during the siege. Clavin and Drury successfully separate fact from fiction while keeping the pages turning. History buffs will be entertained. (Apr.)


Kirkus
Copyright © Kirkus Reviews, used with permission.

Popular historians Drury and Clavin deliver a ripsnortin tale of the early frontier and its first and most powerful legend.The authors open on a frightful note, depicting a 16-year-old son of Daniel Boone being tortured on the frozen scree beneath the Cumberland Mountains shadow line, a Shawnee warrior tearing his fingernails and toenails off before finally killing him. Undeterred, Boone led a party of settlers over the Cumberland Gap, made his way into Kentucky, and in time established a walled compound on the Kentucky River. The narrative seldom finds a moment of calm thereafter. As Drury and Clavin observe, the arrival of Whites across the Appalachians began a slow-motion genocide for many Native peoples, not least of them the Shawnee, Boones principal foe. Boone was unusual for many reasons, not least because he respected, if not completely understood, the spirituality and philosophy that underpinned [the Natives] culture and never underestimated their intelligence. Boones arrival also figured in a complex series of conflicts that involved France, Britain, Indigenous peoples, and the newly founded U.S. Keeping his fellow settlers alive in the bargain landed Boone in more than one spot of trouble. He was held prisoner by the British, accused of loyalist sympathies by frontier revolutionaries, and, in the end, recognized as a true patriot whose actions kept the British from flanking the Continental Army in the South. A particularly exciting set piece is the authors account of a combined British/Canadian/Native siege of Boonesborough in 1778, with bad results for one loud-voiced spokesman for the besiegers: The next time Pompey showed his face, Collins blew it into the Kentucky River. The war on the frontier became bloodier still. Though not as comprehensive as John Mack Faraghers 1992 biography Daniel Boone, this book offers a vivid account of Boones frontier years, one that may not be for the faint of heart.A well-written, fast-paced account that neatly bridges the gap between historical fact and fiction. Copyright Kirkus Reviews, used with permission.


Library Journal
(c) Copyright Library Journals LLC, a wholly owned subsidiary of Media Source, Inc. No redistribution permitted.

No. 1 New York Times best-selling coauthors Clavin and Drury (The Heart of Everything That Is) again join forces, this time investigating the legendary Daniel Boone, who may or may not have worn a coonskin hat but was certainly there at the bloody birth of a nation and helped forge its path. With a 125,000-copy first printing.


Kirkus
Copyright © Kirkus Reviews, used with permission.

Popular historians Drury and Clavin deliver a ripsnortin’ tale of the early frontier and its first and most powerful legend. The authors open on a frightful note, depicting a 16-year-old son of Daniel Boone being tortured “on the frozen scree beneath the Cumberland Mountain’s shadow line,” a Shawnee warrior tearing his fingernails and toenails off before finally killing him. Undeterred, Boone led a party of settlers over the Cumberland Gap, made his way into Kentucky, and in time established a walled compound on the Kentucky River. The narrative seldom finds a moment of calm thereafter. As Drury and Clavin observe, the arrival of Whites across the Appalachians began “a slow-motion genocide” for many Native peoples, not least of them the Shawnee, Boone’s principal foe. Boone was unusual for many reasons, not least because he “respected, if not completely understood, the spirituality and philosophy that underpinned [the Natives’] culture” and “never underestimated their intelligence.” Boone’s arrival also figured in a complex series of conflicts that involved France, Britain, Indigenous peoples, and the newly founded U.S. Keeping his fellow settlers alive in the bargain landed Boone in more than one spot of trouble. He was held prisoner by the British, accused of loyalist sympathies by frontier revolutionaries, and, in the end, recognized as a true patriot whose actions kept the British from flanking the Continental Army in the South. A particularly exciting set piece is the authors’ account of a combined British/Canadian/Native siege of Boonesborough in 1778, with bad results for one loud-voiced spokesman for the besiegers: “The next time Pompey showed his face, Collins blew it into the Kentucky River.” The war on the frontier became bloodier still. Though not as comprehensive as John Mack Faragher’s 1992 biography Daniel Boone, this book offers a vivid account of Boone’s frontier years, one that may not be for the faint of heart. A well-written, fast-paced account that neatly bridges the gap between historical fact and fiction. Copyright © Kirkus Reviews, used with permission.

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