Reviews for Don't hug doug (he doesn't like it). [electronic resource] :

Publishers Weekly
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This upbeat, second person–perspective narrative introduces readers to Doug, a smiling child with dark hair, light brown skin, and round red glasses, who does not like hugs—the lone exception being a “JUST RIGHT/ bedtime hug /from his mom.” In rapid-fire parallel sentences, characters suggest situations in which Doug might like a hug (“hello hugs,” “goodbye hugs,” “game-winning home run hugs,” and “dropped ice cream cone hugs” round out one paneled page) before Doug shuts each of them down firmly with a friendly smile and a negatory response. “Don’t worry—Doug likes YOU,” Finison’s assured text declares. “He just doesn’t like HUGS.” Wiseman’s digital art has a simple, bold allure, supplemented by panels and speech bubbles. A gently humorous picture book that kindly, effectively highlights the importance of asking others before initiating physical contact. Ages 3–7. (Jan.)


Book list
From Booklist, Copyright © American Library Association. Used with permission.

A simple, effective plea to respect other people’s boundaries is here set in a comical framework. The narrator argues on behalf of Doug, a boy who does not like to be hugged (high fives are OK, though), using a Green Eggs and Ham–like rhyme-and-repetition scheme, telling readers at the outset that they can hug a pug or a bug or a slug, “but don’t hug Doug.” Doug speaks up for himself, too, saying things like “No hugs, please,” and “Seriously, no hugs.” The bright, flat, funny illustrations include plenty of cartoony kids, and, as the narrator explains why Doug doesn’t like hugs, Doug illustrates this with his own pencil drawing of two robots trying to hug—hugs are too “squeezy, squooshy, squashy, smooshy.” The narrator extends the argument out by showing people on a park bench: Can you hug them? The answer is a firm, “Ask first.” A fun way to deliver the truth of different strokes for different folks.


Book list
From Booklist, Copyright © American Library Association. Used with permission.

A simple, effective plea to respect other people’s boundaries is here set in a comical framework. The narrator argues on behalf of Doug, a boy who does not like to be hugged (high fives are OK, though), using a Green Eggs and Ham–like rhyme-and-repetition scheme, telling readers at the outset that they can hug a pug or a bug or a slug, “but don’t hug Doug.” Doug speaks up for himself, too, saying things like “No hugs, please,” and “Seriously, no hugs.” The bright, flat, funny illustrations include plenty of cartoony kids, and, as the narrator explains why Doug doesn’t like hugs, Doug illustrates this with his own pencil drawing of two robots trying to hug—hugs are too “squeezy, squooshy, squashy, smooshy.” The narrator extends the argument out by showing people on a park bench: Can you hug them? The answer is a firm, “Ask first.” A fun way to deliver the truth of different strokes for different folks.


Kirkus
Copyright © Kirkus Reviews, used with permission.

A cheerful approach to basic consent. In rollicking text readers learn that Doug, a brown-skinned child with red glasses, “likes to sort his rock collection, and try on his sock collection, and draw with his chalk collection.” He often has a smile on his face and “just doesn’t like hugs.” “Doug likes YOU,” the book assures readers, explaining that Doug only likes good-night hugs, from his mom. The next page points to people of various ages and racial presentations and poses a question: “Can you hug these people? There’s only one way to find out.” “ASK!” Doug rejoins. Readers learn that “Some people love hugs. Lots of people don’t. And lots of people are somewhere in the middle.” A collage of purple, green, and blue people (and one porcupine), one in hijab and the others with racially differentiated hair, share their preferences around physical affection. The story ends with Doug racing around high-fiving a diverse group of humans and nonhumans. Especially important is that Doug never gives a reason why he doesn’t like hugs—he just doesn’t, and the reason why doesn’t matter, because he gets to make that decision for himself. Even though it doesn’t have—or really need—a plot, this book will still be fun to read aloud or explore independently. (This book was reviewed digitally with 9.5-by-19-inch double-page spreads viewed at 8.3% of actual size.) An excellent update on the golden rule: treat people how they want to be treated. (Picture book. 4-7) Copyright © Kirkus Reviews, used with permission.

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