Reviews for My heart is a chainsaw

Book list
From Booklist, Copyright © American Library Association. Used with permission.

Following the success of The Only Good Indians (2020), Jones returns with a love letter to the slasher film. Jade, half-Indian, poor, and motherless, finds her only solace in the slasher movies of the 1980s and the extra-credit essays she writes for her history teacher explaining the genre’s themes. A group of rich investors “discovers” beautiful and secluded Proofrock, Idaho, despite its troubling history of mass murders and lake witches. Issues of class and privilege collide with the threat of a Fourth of July massacre, though no one takes Jade's warnings seriously. She pins all hope for survival on the new girl—the rich and beautiful Letha, the perfect "final girl." Readers will be drawn in by the effortless storytelling and Jade’s unique cadence. This is a methodically paced story where every detail both entertains and matters, and the expertly rendered setting explodes with violent action. This brilliantly crafted, heartbreakingly beautiful slasher presents a new type of authentic "final girl," one that isn’t “pure” and may not be totally innocent, yet can still be a vessel for hope. Pair this with thought-provoking, trauma-themed horror such as Paul Tremblay’s A Head Full of Ghosts (2015) or Victor LaValle’s The Changeling (2017).


Library Journal
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Debuter Lange's We Are the Brennans features almost-30 Sunday Brennan returning from Los Angeles to New York to explain to both family and ex-fiancÚ why she left them five years ago (100,000-copy first printing).


Book list
From Booklist, Copyright © American Library Association. Used with permission.

Following the success of The Only Good Indians (2020), Jones returns with a love letter to the slasher film. Jade, half-Indian, poor, and motherless, finds her only solace in the slasher movies of the 1980s and the extra-credit essays she writes for her history teacher explaining the genre’s themes. A group of rich investors “discovers” beautiful and secluded Proofrock, Idaho, despite its troubling history of mass murders and lake witches. Issues of class and privilege collide with the threat of a Fourth of July massacre, though no one takes Jade's warnings seriously. She pins all hope for survival on the new girl—the rich and beautiful Letha, the perfect "final girl." Readers will be drawn in by the effortless storytelling and Jade’s unique cadence. This is a methodically paced story where every detail both entertains and matters, and the expertly rendered setting explodes with violent action. This brilliantly crafted, heartbreakingly beautiful slasher presents a new type of authentic "final girl," one that isn’t “pure” and may not be totally innocent, yet can still be a vessel for hope. Pair this with thought-provoking, trauma-themed horror such as Paul Tremblay’s A Head Full of Ghosts (2015) or Victor LaValle’s The Changeling (2017).


Publishers Weekly
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Jones (The Only Good Indians) expertly mixes the frightening and the funny in this no-holds-barred homage to classic horror tropes written under the heady influence of splatter films. Its outsider heroine is Jade Daniels, an affectionately cheeky 17-year-old high schooler of Blackfoot descent, who finds escape from her dead-end life in rural Proofrock, Idaho, by gorging on a steady diet of slasher flicks. When a spate of bizarre deaths targeting the wealthy residents of Proofrock’s newly developed Terra Nova community rocks the town, Jade recognizes all of the elements of her favorite films’ formulae at play. Certain that the deaths presage a bloody slaughter, she tries—with little credulity from authorities—to warn the town of what is coming. Jones weaves an astonishing amount of slasher film lore into his novel, punctuating the text with short term papers written by Jade on the history and functions of the genre. Meanwhile, the tension builds to a graphic finale perfectly appropriate for the novel’s cinematic scope. Horror fans won’t need to have seen all of the films referenced to be blown away by this audacious extravaganza. Agent: B.J. Robbins, B.J. Robbins Literary. (Aug.)

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