Fox Lake District Library · 
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 · 
Fox Lake, IL 60020
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New York Times Bestsellers
Week of April 19, 2015
FICTION
#1  (Last Week: 1 • Weeks on List: 13)  
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Paula Hawkins
#2  (Last Week: 4 • Weeks on List: 49)  
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Anthony Doerr
#3  (Last Week: 3 • Weeks on List: 3)  
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Harlan Coben

Library Journal Adam Price's biggest concern is whether his son will be part of the high school's traveling lacrosse team. During a team draft meeting, a stranger approaches Adam, giving him devastating news about his wife, Corinne. When Adam confronts Corinne, she asks him to give her some time and disappears, leaving him a cryptic text message. This begins Adam's nightmare as he tries to find out the truth, protect his sons, and find his wife. He must also come to realize what Corinne had told him: it isn't what he thinks, and many things are not what they seem. Coben (Missing You) deftly weaves many seemingly disconnected characters into one cohesive tale of suspense, with an expertly realized New Jersey setting. Verdict Coben's latest stand-alone is a great story for people who like to examine the ephemeral nature of those strings that bind our dreams to our reality. And while it is a slight departure from his usual type of thriller, this book will be enjoyed as well by Coben's many fans. [See Prepub Alert, 9/22/14.]-Elizabeth Masterson, Mecklenburg Cty. Jail Lib., Charlotte, NC (c) Copyright 2015. Library Journals LLC, a wholly owned subsidiary of Media Source, Inc. No redistribution permitted.

(c) Copyright Library Journals LLC, a wholly owned subsidiary of Media Source, Inc. No redistribution permitted.

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#4  (Last Week: - • Weeks on List: 1)  
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Stuart Woods
#5  (Last Week: - • Weeks on List: 1)  
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Donna Leon

Publishers Weekly In bestseller Leon's pleasurable 24th mystery to feature Commissario Guido Brunetti (after 2014's By Its Cover), Brunetti reunites with opera diva Flavia Petrelli, whom he exonerated of murder in his first outing, Death at La Fenice. Flavia, performing in a production of Tosca, confides that an unknown admirer has followed her from London to St. Petersburg to Venice, showering her with increasingly extravagant displays of yellow roses. As the fan intrudes into her personal space-placing flowers in her apartment building, leaving a priceless necklace in her dressing room, and writing possessive notes-Brunetti educates himself about stalking. When two people connected to Flavia are seriously injured, he realizes the singer herself is in danger. Leon's Venice is peopled with urbane, sophisticated characters, and she flavors the novel with insights into stagecraft, Tosca, and the storied La Fenice opera house. Series aficionados as well as those who appreciate elegant settings and cultured conversation should find this a deeply satisfying escape. Agent: Susanna Bauknecht, Diogenes Verlag (Switzerland). (Apr.) © Copyright PWxyz, LLC. All rights reserved.

(c) Copyright PWxyz, LLC. All rights reserved

Library Journal Starred Review. The ever-incredible Leon's 24th stunning entry in her stellar mysteries featuring Commissario Guido Brunetti brings the series full circle, revisiting Venice's Teatro La Fenice opera house and the famous soprano, Flavia Petrelli, featured in Death at La Fenice, the inaugural book. Once again, Flavia sings the title role in Puccini's Tosca, but at this point she is a seasoned, divorced diva with two children, enervated by the hard work of singing and cynical about the persistent drama surrounding the production. Moreover, she is being stalked by an unknown "admirer" whose disturbing attention is escalating toward violence. Once again, Brunetti intervenes, but Flavia's love for her children determines the outcome. VERDICT This is a dark novel with an ironic title that resonates on multiple levels. In particular, it explores the nature of love-and hate-in a manner that will haunt readers well after they have finished the book. Another provocative addition to a fine series, certain to appeal to aficionados of profound literary mysteries such as Louise Penny's How the Light Gets In. [See Prepub Alert, 10/27/14.]-Lynne Maxwell, West Virginia Univ. Coll. of Law Lib., Morgantown (c) Copyright 2015. Library Journals LLC, a wholly owned subsidiary of Media Source, Inc. No redistribution permitted.

(c) Copyright Library Journals LLC, a wholly owned subsidiary of Media Source, Inc. No redistribution permitted.

Book list *Starred Review* For many fans, the high points in Leon's beloved Guido Brunetti series have been the two novels featuring opera diva Flavia Perelli: Death at La Fenice (1992), the series opener, and Aqua Alta (1996). In both tales, Venetian police commissario Brunetti solves crimes that at first appear to implicate the diva. Now, finally, Flavia returns to Venice to star in Tosca at La Fenice, the city's historic opera house. This time, though, she is not a suspect in a crime but a potential victim. An obsessive fan is showering Flavia with inappropriate gifts gifts that carry with them the suggestion of menace. When a male singer whom Flavia supported is assaulted, it appears that the threat has become tangible. Brunetti is asked by Flavia for help, and he responds as he always does, by attempting to discern not only the facts but also the psychology behind them in this case, the process through which an obsessive fan becomes a potentially lethal stalker. As always, there is rich interplay between the characters Brunetti and his wife, Paola, of course, but also Flavia, now a close friend as well as a woman in need of protection. And, best of all, the reappearance of Flavia gives Leon the opportunity to display her deep love of music and to construct a marvelous climactic scene between Flavia and her fan that parallels the finale of Tosca. Brava! HIGH-DEMAND BACKSTORY: The Guido Brunetti novels have sold more than two million copies in North America, and the previous entry, By Its Cover, reached number seven on the New York Times best-seller list.--Ott, Bill Copyright 2010 Booklist

From Booklist, Copyright © American Library Association. Used with permission.

Library Journal Starred Review. The ever-incredible Leon's 24th stunning entry in her stellar mysteries featuring Commissario Guido Brunetti brings the series full circle, revisiting Venice's Teatro La Fenice opera house and the famous soprano, Flavia Petrelli, featured in Death at La Fenice, the inaugural book. Once again, Flavia sings the title role in Puccini's Tosca, but at this point she is a seasoned, divorced diva with two children, enervated by the hard work of singing and cynical about the persistent drama surrounding the production. Moreover, she is being stalked by an unknown "admirer" whose disturbing attention is escalating toward violence. Once again, Brunetti intervenes, but Flavia's love for her children determines the outcome. VERDICT This is a dark novel with an ironic title that resonates on multiple levels. In particular, it explores the nature of love-and hate-in a manner that will haunt readers well after they have finished the book. Another provocative addition to a fine series, certain to appeal to aficionados of profound literary mysteries such as Louise Penny's How the Light Gets In. [See Prepub Alert, 10/27/14.]-Lynne Maxwell, West Virginia Univ. Coll. of Law Lib., Morgantown (c) Copyright 2015. Library Journals LLC, a wholly owned subsidiary of Media Source, Inc. No redistribution permitted.

(c) Copyright Library Journals LLC, a wholly owned subsidiary of Media Source, Inc. No redistribution permitted.

Book list *Starred Review* For many fans, the high points in Leon's beloved Guido Brunetti series have been the two novels featuring opera diva Flavia Perelli: Death at La Fenice (1992), the series opener, and Aqua Alta (1996). In both tales, Venetian police commissario Brunetti solves crimes that at first appear to implicate the diva. Now, finally, Flavia returns to Venice to star in Tosca at La Fenice, the city's historic opera house. This time, though, she is not a suspect in a crime but a potential victim. An obsessive fan is showering Flavia with inappropriate gifts gifts that carry with them the suggestion of menace. When a male singer whom Flavia supported is assaulted, it appears that the threat has become tangible. Brunetti is asked by Flavia for help, and he responds as he always does, by attempting to discern not only the facts but also the psychology behind them in this case, the process through which an obsessive fan becomes a potentially lethal stalker. As always, there is rich interplay between the characters Brunetti and his wife, Paola, of course, but also Flavia, now a close friend as well as a woman in need of protection. And, best of all, the reappearance of Flavia gives Leon the opportunity to display her deep love of music and to construct a marvelous climactic scene between Flavia and her fan that parallels the finale of Tosca. Brava! HIGH-DEMAND BACKSTORY: The Guido Brunetti novels have sold more than two million copies in North America, and the previous entry, By Its Cover, reached number seven on the New York Times best-seller list.--Ott, Bill Copyright 2010 Booklist

From Booklist, Copyright © American Library Association. Used with permission.

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#6  (Last Week: 8 • Weeks on List: 10)  
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Kristin Hannah
 
#7  (Last Week: 6 • Weeks on List: 2)  
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Sara Gruen
#8  (Last Week: 5 • Weeks on List: 2)  
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Steve Berry
#9  (Last Week: - • Weeks on List: 1)  
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Jo Nesbo

Publishers Weekly Olav-a hit man, or "fixer"-narrates this thin standalone from Nesbo (The Son) set in 1970s Oslo. His boss, drug kingpin Daniel Hoffmann, has an unusual assignment for Olav: "He wanted me to fix his wife." Olav sets up surveillance on the beautiful Corina Hoffman from a hotel across the street and watches her let a man into the apartment. It's someone she clearly knows, but the man's first action is to strike her, then he sleeps with her, and Olav figures she's being blackmailed. Olav, whose sympathies shift to Corina, hopes to save her and double-cross his boss in a plot reminiscent of a 1940s American noir novel. A damaged loner, Olav is full of contradictions, but he's more intelligent and emotional than he'll admit, which gives the book a bit of humanity and humor. Nesbo fans will enjoy this slender story, though newcomers may find it altogether too macabre. Agent: Niclas Salomonsson, Salomonsson Agency (Sweden). (Apr.) © Copyright PWxyz, LLC. All rights reserved.

(c) Copyright PWxyz, LLC. All rights reserved

Book list *Starred Review* Nesbø tends to serve both small plates and large. The latter are typically novels in the Harry Hole series, multidimensional thrillers that often jump from the present to the past as the many-demoned hero sinks his teeth into a new case; the small plates, on the other hand, like this jewel of a novel, have a much narrower focus, homing in on one character caught in crisis at one sharply lit moment in time. Olav is a killer for hire; it's not that he particularly wants the job, but as a criminal, he can't do anything else well. Too sensitive to rob innocents or feed them drugs; killing is simpler. Until, that is, the boss decides to kill his wife and gives Olav the job. Danger bells clang: too personal, too likely the boss will want to have Olav killed after the job is finished. Oh, and after Olav gets a look at Mrs. Boss, there's another problem: he's in love with her. Attempts to carve a separate peace rarely work; the world is too much with us. Olav knows that but tries anyway; we admire him for it, the horror of his chosen profession notwithstanding. Nesbø tells this small but ­razor-sharp story with precision and understated eloquence, even generating suspense despite the inevitability built into the plot: we know there will be blood on snow, but we're not quite sure whose and how much. HIGH-DEMAND BACKSTORY: A 60,000 first printing isn't that high for Nesbø, but expect this small plate to draw a big audience all the same.--Ott, Bill Copyright 2010 Booklist

From Booklist, Copyright © American Library Association. Used with permission.

Library Journal Olav and his employer, a major crime boss, agree that Olav is good for one thing only-serving as a hit man who expertly "fixes" up messes. However, when Olav is commissioned to kill his boss's wife, things start to go south for him. Olav knows if he takes her out, he is in danger of knowing too much and will have to be eliminated as well. He has to figure out a plan that will allow him to please his boss and still survive the contract. Unfortunately when he tails the wife, Olav becomes smitten with his new target. Nesbo steps away from his popular "Harry Hole" series (Police) to create a sympathetic, soft-hearted assassin trying to endure while following orders. This title is one of three short novels Nesbo wrote under the pen name Tom Johansson that have been optioned for movie rights (they were purchased by Leonardo DiCaprio and the movies will possibly star him). -VERDICT Olav is not Harry Hole, but readers will love him just the same. This tender killer who tries to maintain reason and compassion in a brutal world will appeal to Nesbo's fans and generate new followers. Highly recommended. [See Prepub Alert, 11/17/14.]-Deb West, Gannon Univ. Lib., Erie, PA © Copyright 2015. Library Journals LLC, a wholly owned subsidiary of Media Source, Inc. No redistribution permitted.

(c) Copyright Library Journals LLC, a wholly owned subsidiary of Media Source, Inc. No redistribution permitted.

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#10  (Last Week: - • Weeks on List: 1)  
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James Patterson and Peter de Jonge


NONFICTION
#1  (Last Week: - • Weeks on List: 1)  
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David Fisher
#2  (Last Week: 1 • Weeks on List: 5)  
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Erik Larson
#3  (Last Week: - • Weeks on List: 1)  
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Kate Andersen Brower
 
#4  (Last Week: 2 • Weeks on List: 27)  
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Atul Gawande
#5  (Last Week: - • Weeks on List: 1)  
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Candice Bergen
#6  (Last Week: 13 • Weeks on List: 2)  
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Mary Norris

Publishers Weekly Norris has spent more than 35 years in the New Yorker's legendary copy department, earning the nickname Comma Queen along the way. So it makes sense that her first book is a delightful discourse on the most common grammar, punctuation, and usage challenges faced by writers of all stripes. Not surprisingly, Norris writes well-with wit, sass, and smarts-and the book is part memoir, part manual. She recounts the history of Webster's Dictionary; explains when to use who vs. whom and that vs. which; distinguishes between the dash, colon, and the semicolon; delves into the comma and the hyphen; and weighs in on the use of profanity in writing. Norris also finds ways to reference the Lord's Prayer, the Simpsons, Moby-Dick, and, in a touching anecdote, her own sister. The New Yorker has an unconventional house style-for instance, the magazine uses diaeresis marks in words like coöperate, where the prefix (co-) ends in the same vowel used at the beginning of the stem (operate), to indicate that the vowels are pronounced differently-and, though Norris doesn't always agree with its strict style rules, readers may not agree with her ideas on language. But it's a sure bet that after reading this book, they'll think more about how and what they write. Agent: David Kuhn, Kuhn Projects. (Apr.) © Copyright PWxyz, LLC. All rights reserved.

(c) Copyright PWxyz, LLC. All rights reserved

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#7  (Last Week: - • Weeks on List: 1)  
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Brian Grazer and Charles Fishman