Search All Libraries...
 
 
ALA Notable Books for Children
2014 (Younger Readers)
The adventures of Beekle : the unimaginary friend
Click to search this book in our catalog   Dan Santat
2014 (Younger Readers)
The baby tree
Click to search this book in our catalog   Sophie Blackall
2014 (Younger Readers)
Beautiful moon : a child's prayer
Click to search this book in our catalog   by Tonya Bolden ; illustrated by Eric Velasquez
 
2014 (Younger Readers)
Blizzard.
Click to search this book in our catalog   by John Rocco
2014 (Younger Readers)
A boy and a jaguar
Click to search this book in our catalog   written by Alan Rabinowitz ; illustrated by C tia Chien
2014 (Younger Readers)
The Chicken Squad.
Click to search this book in our catalog   Doreen Cronin ; illustrated by Kevin Cornell Atheneum Books

School Library Journal Gr 2-4-The four intrepid chicks, plus one deadpan dog detective, are back in their second adventure, this time confronted by the titular blue bird who needs help solving a horse-napping. Once again, Cronin's slapstick humor and Cornell's charmingly goofy illustrations create a winning tale that will leave young readers in stitches. This delightful series is a must-own. (c) Copyright 2014. Library Journals LLC, a wholly owned subsidiary of Media Source, Inc. No redistribution permitted.

(c) Copyright Library Journals LLC, a wholly owned subsidiary of Media Source, Inc. No redistribution permitted.

Book list When detective chicks Dirt, Sugar, Poppy, and Sweetie post a flier on a backyard tree, a little blue jay (aka Weird Blue Chicken) comes to the coop asking them to find her missing birdhouse. After interrogating their client, Dirt and Sugar start sleuthing, a process resulting in a little action, a moment of terror, and lots of laughs. This second book in the Chicken Squad series has several attractive features for young readers: the amusing story is relatively long (120 pages) but easy to read, with large type, short sentences, wide-spaced lines, and plenty of appealing illustrations. A funny beginning chapter book.--Phelan, Carolyn Copyright 2010 Booklist

From Booklist, Copyright © American Library Association. Used with permission.

...More
 
2014 (Younger Readers)
A dance like starlight : one ballerina's dream
Click to search this book in our catalog   by Kristy Dempsey ; illustrated by Floyd Cooper

Publishers Weekly Growing up in 1950s Harlem, a girl dreams of being a ballerina, despite the huge obstacles of segregation and poverty. She's urged on by her hardworking mother, mentored by the Ballet Master (who allows her "to join lessons each day/ from the back of the room,/ even though I can't perform/ onstage with white girls"), and inspired by Janet Collins, the "first colored prima ballerina," who makes her debut at Metropolitan Opera while the girl sits in the balcony with her mother. "It's like Miss Collins is dancing for me,/ only for me," she thinks as she imagines herself leaping through the air alongside the beautiful, supremely confident Collins, "showing me who I can be." Although Dempsey's (Surfer Chick) prose-poem tends to be somber and sentimental, Cooper's (Max and the Tag-Along Moon) velvety, peach-hued pictures have passion, energy, and even flashes of humor, making the girl feel like a fully lived character. The story covers familiar inspirational territory, but has the benefit of serving as a brief introduction to the pioneering Collins. Ages 5-8. Author's agent: Kendra Marcus, BookStop Literary Agency. (Jan.) (c) Copyright PWxyz, LLC. All rights reserved.

(c) Copyright PWxyz, LLC. All rights reserved

...More
2014 (Younger Readers)
Dory
Click to search this book in our catalog   by Abby Hanlon

Publishers Weekly Dory's nickname, "Rascal," is an immediate tip-off to the six-year-old's personality, but there's more to Dory than just being a spitfire. To combat her older siblings' refusal to play with her because she's a "baby," Dory conjures up Mary, a monster friend who appreciates her incessant questions, like "Why do we have armpits?" and "What is the opposite of sandwich?" Dory's pestering leads Luke and Violet to tell her that 507-year-old Mrs. Gobble Gracker, "who robs baby girls," is looking for her. This sets Dory's imagination spinning, leading to the appearance of the vampiric Mrs. Gobble Gracker and the gnomelike Mr. Nuggy, who introduces himself as her fairy godmother. Reality and fantasy combine hilariously in a story that, at heart, is about a girl who wants little more than to spend time with her brother and sister. Hanlon's (Ralph Tells a Story) loosely scrawled illustrations, speech balloons, and hand-lettering are an enormous part of the story's humor, channeling Dory's energy and emotions as emphatically as the narration. Time spent with Dory is time well spent. Ages 6-8. Agent: Ann Tobias, A Literary Agency for Children's Books. (Oct.) © Copyright PWxyz, LLC. All rights reserved.

(c) Copyright PWxyz, LLC. All rights reserved

School Library Journal Starred Review. Gr 1-3-Six-year-old Dory, known as Rascal to her family, wants more than anything to be included in her older siblings's fun, but her endless questions and make-believe monsters drive them crazy. When Violet and Luke tell Dory a bedtime story about the evil Mrs. Gobble Grackle, who steals baby girls, they unintentionally feed her already overactive imagination. Dory and her imaginary friend, Mary (who resembles Maurice Sendak's Max), are always on the lookout for monsters, and they thwart Mrs. Gobble Grackle's attempts to kidnap her with banana peels and sleep-inducing darts. When Dory pretends to be the dog her brother has always wanted, she convinces Mrs. G that she isn't the baby to kidnap and sabotages a trip to the doctor's office. Hanlon effectively uses many childlike pencil drawings and word balloons interspersed with a good mix of short and long sentences in brief, episodic chapters full of Dory's hilarious adventures. New vocabulary words are used in context within familiar settings and situations for the audience, creating a successful transitional book for new readers ready for longer stories. Dory ultimately finds a way to prove her bravery to her brother and sister, and readers will laugh at her entertaining antics.-Kristine M. Casper, Huntington Public Library, NY (c) Copyright 2014. Library Journals LLC, a wholly owned subsidiary of Media Source, Inc. No redistribution permitted.

(c) Copyright Library Journals LLC, a wholly owned subsidiary of Media Source, Inc. No redistribution permitted.

Book list A little sister causes all kinds of trouble in Hanlon's debut chapter book. Aimed at beginning readers, it is narrated by six-year-old Dory, whose chief goal in life is to be invited to play with her older brother and sister. Of course, they don't want to play with her because she acts like such a baby, asks constant questions, and plays with imaginary creatures. Indeed Dory has such a vivid imagination that the black-and-white illustrations often picture what Dory believes is happening, not what the rest of the family is experiencing. Young readers may or may not identify with Dory, whose antics annoy even her mother (like when Dory persists in pretending to be a puppy at the doctor's office), but they will better understand another child's intense need for attention. In both words and pictures, Hanlon succeeds in getting inside Dory's head and it's pretty lively in there.--Nolan, Abby Copyright 2014 Booklist

From Booklist, Copyright © American Library Association. Used with permission.

...More
2014 (Younger Readers)
Draw!
Click to search this book in our catalog   Raul Colon ; illustrated by Raul Colon

School Library Journal PreS-Gr 3-Using watercolor and colored pencils, Colon has created a wordless book (based on his childhood) that speaks volumes. A boy, home for the day perhaps because of an illness, sits on his bed reading a book about Africa. He begins to draw. Five identical, intensely colored pictures of the boy with an easel, art supplies, and a pit helmet increase in size as readers begin this richly imagined day on a safari. He draws an elephant as an egret watches, and atop the elephant's back, the boy and bird find a herd of zebras. They pose for him as he sits on a stump. Giraffes thunder by, raising clouds of golden dust. The boy draws them, his body aslant as his eyes follow them. He draws a gorilla, who holds his helmet and shares his sandwich. He draws lions, a water buffalo, and a hippo before sighting a charging rhinoceros. Running with all his might, he barely escapes the rhino. Baboons retrieve his pencils, set up his easel, and draw him. They also eat his sandwiches as the day slides into evening. A spread poignantly captures the parting of boy and elephant. Eyes closed, he lays his head against his friend's side while the elephant's trunk gently caresses the boy's cheek. As six identical paintings decrease in size, the book returns to the boy's pale room, now strewn with drawings. The final scene shows the boy at school, holding the elephant's picture front and center. The pleasure the boy takes in making and sharing his art is palpable. Young artists will love this book, as will all children who know the joy of exploring their own imaginations. A must-have for every library.-Mary Jean Smith, formerly at Southside Elementary School, Lebanon, TN (c) Copyright 2014. Library Journals LLC, a wholly owned subsidiary of Media Source, Inc. No redistribution permitted.

(c) Copyright Library Journals LLC, a wholly owned subsidiary of Media Source, Inc. No redistribution permitted.

Publishers Weekly In Colon's (Baseball Is...) wordless fantasy, a boy lies on his bed, his sketchbook on the floor; he's lost in a large book titled Africa. As he takes up his sketchbook and begins to draw, small full-color panels of himself setting off across the African veldt sail forth from his mind like thought balloons. On the next page, he's entered his fantasy fully; he's in the African grasslands, carrying his drawing supplies and waving to a nearby elephant. After obligingly allowing its portrait to be drawn, the elephant carries the boy to meet other animals who pose for him-zebras, giraffes, and hippos. A rhinoceros portrait ends in near-calamity; a gang of baboons draw the boy. After a tender goodbye to the elephant, another series of sunlit panels retreats into the boy's head as he returns to real life. Colon's visual signature is the use of finely combed lines to trace the contours of his figures, a technique that's at once delicate and sensuous. It's a strongly developed and executed account of a childhood fantasy, urging all young artists to dream and to draw. Ages 4-8. Agency: Morgan Gaynin Inc. (Sept.) (c) Copyright PWxyz, LLC. All rights reserved.

(c) Copyright PWxyz, LLC. All rights reserved

...More
 
2014 (Younger Readers)
Early Bird
Click to search this book in our catalog   Toni Yuly
2014 (Younger Readers)
The farmer and the clown
Click to search this book in our catalog   Marla Frazee
2014 (Younger Readers)
The farmer's away! Baa! Neigh!
Click to search this book in our catalog   Anne Vittur Kennedy
 
2014 (Younger Readers)
Feathers : not just for flying
Click to search this book in our catalog   Melissa Stewart ; illustrated by Sarah S Brannen
2014 (Younger Readers)
Firebird.
Click to search this book in our catalog  
2014 (Younger Readers)
Firefly July : a year of very short poems
Click to search this book in our catalog   selected by Paul B Janeczko ; illustrated by Melissa Sweet
 
2014 (Younger Readers)
Flashlight
Click to search this book in our catalog   by Lizi Boyd

Publishers Weekly Boyd follows Inside Outside (2013) with another wordless picture book, this one about a boy's nocturnal backyard explorations. Working in gouache, Boyd paints on vast expanses of black, outlining the boy (who could easily be the same one from the previous book) and his surroundings in a muted gray-blue; using a flashlight, he aims a cone of white light high and low, creating pops of color amid the darkness. He finds a lost boot, spots bats overhead and mice underfoot, and notices a porcupine in the crook of a tree, among other discoveries. While the book clearly demonstrates just how much animal activity takes place at night, Boyd's goals aren't strictly naturalistic. After the boy drops his flashlight, it's retrieved by the very animals he found before; one by one, they turn the flashlight's crisp beam on him, observing him just as he did them. Once again, Boyd showcases a child who is fully capable of educating and entertaining himself with only a few simple tools (a camping tent, a flashlight) at his disposal. Ages 2-6. Agent: Liza Pulitzer-Voges, Eden Street. (Aug.) (c) Copyright PWxyz, LLC. All rights reserved.

(c) Copyright PWxyz, LLC. All rights reserved

...More
2014 (Younger Readers)
Fox's garden.
Click to search this book in our catalog   Princesse Camcam

Publishers Weekly Starred Review. An act of tender compassion is given (and repaid) in secret during an icy winter night in this memorable addition to the Stories Without Words series, the U.S. debut for this French artist, born Camille Garoche. The story concerns a sleek, rust-colored fox seen darting through a gnarled forest of pale lavender trees beneath swirling snowy skies. Drawn to the orange glow of a building in the distance, the fox is shooed away by the man and woman who live there, before taking shelter in their greenhouse. A small boy, whose red sweater perhaps serves as an early signal that he's an ally to the ruddy fox, sneaks outside to deliver a basket of food. As he sets it down, the full scope of his kindhearted action is revealed: the fox has four tiny kits snuggled under its bushy tail. Camcam creates her images by assembling cut-paper dioramas, which are then lit and photographed. The resulting images possess a subtle dimensionality while the story exudes a haunting winter magic and a strong sense of the way a small kindness can make an enormous difference. Ages 3–8. (Sept.) (c) Copyright PWxyz, LLC. All rights reserved.

(c) Copyright PWxyz, LLC. All rights reserved

...More
2014 (Younger Readers)
Froodle.
Click to search this book in our catalog   Antoinette Portis
 
2014 (Younger Readers)
Gaston
Click to search this book in our catalog   Kelly DiPucchio ; illustrated by Christian Robinson
2014 (Younger Readers)
Green is a chile pepper : a book of colors
Click to search this book in our catalog   by Roseanne Greenfield Thong ; illustrated by John Parra

School Library Journal Thong uses rhyming quatrains to explore colors through elements of culture: yellow masa or corn mash, and green chili peppers. The book ends with a literal rainbow of colors. The illustrations have a folk-art feel and are full of Latino children experiencing the wonders of the world. A perfect choice for the very youngest audiences. (c) Copyright 2013. Library Journals LLC, a wholly owned subsidiary of Media Source, Inc. No redistribution permitted.

(c) Copyright 2010. Library Journals LLC, a wholly owned subsidiary of Media Source, Inc. No redistribution permitted.

School Library Journal PreS-Gr 2-The creators of Round Is a Tortilla (Chronicle, 2013) are back with another Mexican American culture-infused concept book with universal appeal. A little girl and boy walk around their town pointing out the vivid palette that permeates their home and community. "Green are the cornstalks./Green are the pails./Green is a bench/for abuela's tales." The Spanish translation of the featured color is also provided on each spread. Excellent for building vocabulary, this work introduces festive customs such as the Day of the Dead and Mexican folk dance, which are further explained in an extensive glossary. The diversity of the characters refreshingly reflects the diversity of the Latino community. Thong's buoyant rhyming text is perfect for reading aloud and Parra's stunning folk-art illustrations offer vibrant scenes that children will return to again and again. The exuberant depictions of cooking, outdoor parties, and fun craft-making invite myriad extension activities. A choice book for bilingual or STEAM-powered storytimes.-Shelley Diaz, School Library Journal (c) Copyright 2014. Library Journals LLC, a wholly owned subsidiary of Media Source, Inc. No redistribution permitted.

(c) Copyright Library Journals LLC, a wholly owned subsidiary of Media Source, Inc. No redistribution permitted.

Book list Here's a cheerful color-concept book that presents a slice of Latino culture through food and fun. Each double-page spread introduces a color in rhyming, explanatory verse; attractive art; and a colored bubble with the word in English and Spanish. The text states the special uses of the color in the culture Orange are the marigolds on the Day of the Dead while the illustrations, showing children and families celebrating life's events, support and enhance the concepts by filling in the blanks of information not mentioned in the verse. The bold colors of the Latino culture are displayed throughout: swirling red skirts and ribbons of the baile folklorico, pink for pinatas, white for palomitas (popcorn), and orange for the Day of the Dead. An extensive glossary defines each Spanish term, and some words have pronunciations. This book is recommended for both school and public libraries. Spanish-language skills are not necessary to successfully share this lovely book.--Edmundson, Martha Copyright 2010 Booklist

From Booklist, Copyright © American Library Association. Used with permission.

School Library Journal Thong uses rhyming quatrains to explore colors through elements of culture: yellow masa or corn mash, and green chili peppers. The book ends with a literal rainbow of colors. The illustrations have a folk-art feel and are full of Latino children experiencing the wonders of the world. A perfect choice for the very youngest audiences. (c) Copyright 2013. Library Journals LLC, a wholly owned subsidiary of Media Source, Inc. No redistribution permitted.

(c) Copyright Library Journals LLC, a wholly owned subsidiary of Media Source, Inc. No redistribution permitted.

...More
2014 (Younger Readers)
Handle with care : an unusual butterfly journey
Click to search this book in our catalog   Loree Griffin Burns ; Photographs by Ellen Harasimowicz
 
2014 (Younger Readers)
Have you seen my dragon?
Click to search this book in our catalog   Steve Light
2014 (Younger Readers)
Hi, Koo! : a year of seasons
Click to search this book in our catalog   presented by Koo and Jon J Muth
2014 (Younger Readers)
The iridescence of birds
Click to search this book in our catalog   Patricia MacLachlan ; illustrated by Hadley Hooper
 
2014 (Younger Readers)
Little Roja Riding Hood
Click to search this book in our catalog   Susan Middleton Elya ; illustrated by Susan Guevara
2014 (Younger Readers)
Little Melba and her big trombone
Click to search this book in our catalog   by Katheryn Russell-Brown ; illustrations by Frank Morrison
2014 (Younger Readers)
Mama built a little nest
Click to search this book in our catalog   Jennifer Ward ; illustrated by Steve Jenkins
 
2014 (Younger Readers)
The most magnificent thing
Click to search this book in our catalog   written and illustrated by Ashley Spires
2014 (Younger Readers)
Mr. Putter & Tabby turn the page
Click to search this book in our catalog   Cynthia Rylant & Arthur Howard
2014 (Younger Readers)
My teacher is a monster! (no, I am not)
Click to search this book in our catalog   by Peter Brown
 
2014 (Younger Readers)
Nana in the city
Click to search this book in our catalog   by Lauren Castillo
2014 (Younger Readers)
Naptime
Click to search this book in our catalog   Iris de Mo y ; translation by Shelley Tanaka
2014 (Younger Readers)
The noisy paint box : the colors and sounds of Kandinsky's abstract art
Click to search this book in our catalog   by Barb Rosenstock ; illustrated by Mary GrandPre

Publishers Weekly "Is it a house?" "Is it a flower?" "What's it supposed to be?" When an aunt gives Moscow schoolboy Vasily Kandinsky a paint box, no one knows what to make of the wild shapes he creates. He doesn't just see the colors. He hears them: "blaring crimson... burbling green, clanging orange, and tinkling violet." Even after he gives up his career teaching law years later and decides to study art, his teachers steer him toward traditional subjects. He resists, and his works become the art world's first abstract paintings. Rosenstock (Thomas Jefferson Builds a Library) focuses on passages of Kandinsky's writing that seem to indicate he experienced synesthesia, the neurological phenomenon that blurs the boundaries between the senses, and her prose strikes a balance between lightheartedness and lyricism. GrandPre's (The Wee Hours) paintings, meanwhile, conjure up an entire epoch, lingering over the candelabras and tasseled drapes of the Kandinskys' apartment, breathing life into all the characters, and conveying the energy and vitality of the colors Kandinsky hears. Contains an afterword and reproductions of some of Kandinsky's works. Ages 4-8. Author's agent: Rosemary Stimola, Stimola Literary Studio. (Feb.) (c) Copyright PWxyz, LLC. All rights reserved.

(c) Copyright PWxyz, LLC. All rights reserved

Book list *Starred Review* Richly colored, large acrylic paint and paper collage pictures illustrate the life of Vasily Kandinsky, one of the first painters of abstract art. As a young boy, Vasya was given a paint box, and when he first mixed colors, he was amazed to find he could hear the colors he created. Throughout his early life, Kandinsky struggled to live as others expected but couldn't forget his exhilarating experiences with painting. Even after giving in and taking lessons, he was unable to suppress the need to create his own style of art. He would see colors and hear music, hear music and see colors. Art should make you feel. Like music. Narrow white frames surround the wonderfully dense illustrations that reveal the sounds the colors make to the artist. The rich word choice is a delight: pistachio, cobalt, and saffron introduce readers to colors while hissing, blaring, and whispering reveal the sounds of the colors. This not a full biography, but rather a revelation of a real and talented person striving to express himself and succeeding. The author's note and source list impart more information. This is a beautiful blend of colors, music, and life.--Owen, Maryann Copyright 2010 Booklist

From Booklist, Copyright © American Library Association. Used with permission.

School Library Journal Gr 1-4-A stirring tribute to a prominent pioneer of abstract art, Paintbox follows the life of Russian-born artist Vasya Kandinsky from his childhood to adulthood, conveying the astounding imagery conjured in the painter's (probably genetic) condition, synesthesia, which caused sensory fields to collide in explosions that enabled him, for example, to hear colors. In this delightful homage, Rosenstock's crisp visual language unites with GrandPre's deeply expressive and whimsical paintings to re-create the intriguing world of art as seen through Kandinsky's distinct lens. The book offers diverse potential for different types of study, whether one is reading for information or for pleasure. Outstanding.-Kathryn Diman, Bass Harbor Memorial Library, Bernard, ME (c) Copyright 2014. Library Journals LLC, a wholly owned subsidiary of Media Source, Inc. No redistribution permitted.

(c) Copyright 2010. Library Journals LLC, a wholly owned subsidiary of Media Source, Inc. No redistribution permitted.

...More
 
2014 (Younger Readers)
The pigeon needs a bath!
Click to search this book in our catalog   words and pictures by Mo Willems
2014 (Younger Readers)
Queen Victoria's bathing machine
Click to search this book in our catalog   words by Gloria Whelan ; pictures by Nancy Carpenter

Publishers Weekly Queen Victoria is ready to break free from the constraints of life at the top (including literal ones, like corsets) and take a swim in the ocean. But that would never do given the mores of the era named after her-until her beloved husband Albert hits on a solution: a covered wooden cart with an undressing room that can be rolled into the sea, allowing the swimmer to discreetly enter the water. "No one will get so much as a peep," Albert assures her, "except for the creatures down in the deep." Whelan's (Homeless Bird) rhyming bounds along with a crackle worthy of Gilbert and Sullivan, and Carpenter's (Big Bear's Big Boat) digital drawings are sublime. Her portrait of a loving marriage (which includes a scene of the Queen and Her Consort canoodling-in their nightgowns!) is every bit as wonderful as the busier scenes in which Albert (with assists from the couple's many children) devises his contraption. But the finest image is the penultimate, which finds an ecstatic Victoria gliding through the lapis water in her swimming costume. Ages 5-8. (Apr.) (c) Copyright PWxyz, LLC. All rights reserved.

(c) Copyright PWxyz, LLC. All rights reserved

Book list *Starred Review* Poor Queen Victoria gazes longingly at the sea from her balcony while being tightened into a sweaty corset and petticoats at the start of this lilting picture book from the author of Small Acts of Amazing Courage (2011). It would be indecent, after all, to see more of the queen than her hands and her face, but taking a dip in her full regalia would mean a quick trip to the seafloor. How can the queen enjoy a summer swim while still retaining her royal modesty? After abandoning his idea of a catapult to fling Her Majesty into the ocean, industrious Prince Albert devises a cart to be wheeled into the surf, so Victoria can change into her bathing costume and step into the water hidden from nosy onlookers. Carpenter's jaunty illustrations, digitally rendered line drawings with colorful washes, depict the hot, uncomfortable queen surrounded by her beloved, rambunctious gaggle of children, who all pitch in to help build Albert's invention. Based on Prince Albert's real invention (a photo of the bathing machine and a brief biography of Queen Victoria is appended), this swingy, silly story in rhyming couplets offers a cheery glimpse into the life of a queen and a charming lesson on how necessity is the mother of invention. The informative author's note and bibliography lead readers on to more.--Hunter, Sarah Copyright 2014 Booklist

From Booklist, Copyright © American Library Association. Used with permission.

School Library Journal K-Gr 3-In delightful rhyming prose, Whelan brings history to life recounting an amusing anecdote of Queen Victoria and her bathing machine (currently on display at Osborne House on the Isle of Wight). One hot summer day, the British queen longs to take a refreshing dip in the sea, but her lady-in-waiting is scandalized. "It would be a disgrace/to see more of the queen than her hands and her face." Victoria's devoted husband, Albert, gives all his genius to the problem, promising to come up with a way to transport her unseen from the beach to the water. He discards his first idea involving a catapult, but inspiration strikes in the middle of the night. "Just after midnight/Albert sprang from the bed./A brilliant idea/had come to his head." He starts working on his invention the next morning, constructing a portable dressing room on wheels. Impressed and excited, Victoria dons her bathing suit inside the clever contraption and the bathing machine is then rolled into the sea, whereupon she dives right into the surf and indulges in a glorious swim. The digital artwork deftly portrays the loving relationship shared by Victoria and Albert. Comical details and the inclusion of the royal couple's nine mischievous children in many of the scenes add to the fun. For a royal day out at the library, pair this outstanding title with Celeste Davidson Mannis's The Queen's Progress (Viking, 2003).-Linda L. Walkins, Saint Joseph Preparatory High School, Boston, MA (c) Copyright 2014. Library Journals LLC, a wholly owned subsidiary of Media Source, Inc. No redistribution permitted.

(c) Copyright Library Journals LLC, a wholly owned subsidiary of Media Source, Inc. No redistribution permitted.

...More
2014 (Younger Readers)
Sam and dave dig a hole.
Click to search this book in our catalog   Mac Barnett and Jon Klassen
 
2014 (Younger Readers)
Shh! We Have a Plan.
Click to search this book in our catalog   Chris Haughton
2014 (Younger Readers)
Star stuff : Carl Sagan and the mysteries of the cosmos
Click to search this book in our catalog   Stephanie Roth Sisson
2014 (Younger Readers)
Tap tap boom boom
Click to search this book in our catalog   Elizabeth Bluemle ; illustrated by G Brian Karas
 
2014 (Younger Readers)
Telephone
Click to search this book in our catalog   by Mac Barnett ; illustrated by Jen Corace
2014 (Younger Readers)
Tiny Creatures The World of Microbes.
Click to search this book in our catalog   by Nicola Davies and Emily Sutton
2014 (Younger Readers)
Viva Frida!
Click to search this book in our catalog   Yuyi Morales
 
2014 (Younger Readers)
Waiting is not easy!.
Click to search this book in our catalog   by Mo Willems
2014 (Younger Readers)
Water rolls, water rises
Click to search this book in our catalog   by Pat Mora and Meilo So
2014 (Younger Readers)
Weeds find a way
Click to search this book in our catalog   Cynthia Jenson-Elliott ; illustrated by Carolyn Fisher
 
2014 (Younger Readers)
Winter Bees & Other Poems of the Cold
Click to search this book in our catalog   Written by Joyce Sidman and illustrated by Rick Allen
2014 (Younger Readers)
Work : an occupational ABC
Click to search this book in our catalog   Kellen Hatanaka
2014 (Younger Readers)
You are small.
Click to search this book in our catalog  
 
2014 (Middle Readers)
Absolutely almost
Click to search this book in our catalog   Lisa Graff
2014 (Middle Readers)
Arcady's goal
Click to search this book in our catalog   written and illustrated by Eugene Yelchin
2013
Angel Island : gateway to Gold Mountain
Click to search this book in our catalog   Russell Freedman ; Chinese poems translated by Evans Chan
 
2014 (Middle Readers)
Before after.
Click to search this book in our catalog   by Matthias Aregui and Anne-Margot Ramstein
2014 (Middle Readers)
Brown girl dreaming.
Click to search this book in our catalog   by Jacqueline Woodson
2014 (Middle Readers)
The Boundless
Click to search this book in our catalog   Kenneth Oppel
 
2014
The case of the vanishing little brown bats : a scientific mystery
Click to search this book in our catalog   Sandra Markle
2014 (Middle Readers)
Chasing cheetahs : the race to save Africa's fastest cats
Click to search this book in our catalog   written by Sy Montgomery ; photographs by Nic Bishop
2014 (Middle Readers)
Dare the wind
Click to search this book in our catalog   Tracey Fern ; pictures by Emily Arnold McCully
 
2014 (Middle Readers)
El deafo.
Click to search this book in our catalog   by Cece Bell
2014 (Middle Readers)
Eye to eye : how animals see the world
Click to search this book in our catalog   Steve Jenkins
2014 (Middle Readers)
The fourteenth goldfish
Click to search this book in our catalog   Jennifer L Holm
 
2014 (Middle Readers)
Freedom Summer : the 1964 Struggle for Civil Rights in Mississippi
Click to search this book in our catalog   by Susan Rubin
2014 (Middle Readers)
Half a chance
Click to search this book in our catalog   Cynthia Lord
2014 (Middle Readers)
The great Greene heist
Click to search this book in our catalog   Varian Johnson
 
2014 (Middle Readers)
Harlem hellfighters
Click to search this book in our catalog   by J Patrick Lewis ; illustrated by Gary Kelley
2014 (Middle Readers)
Hello, i'm johnny cash.
Click to search this book in our catalog  
2014 (Middle Readers)
Hidden : a child's story of the Holocaust
Click to search this book in our catalog   written by Lo c Dauvillier ; illustrated by Marc Lizano ; color by Greg Salsedo ; translated by Alexis Siegel
 
2014 (Middle Readers)
Hope is a Ferris wheel
Click to search this book in our catalog   a novel by Robin Herrera
2014 (Middle Readers)
I lived on Butterfly Hill
Click to search this book in our catalog   Marjorie Agos n ; translated by EM O'Connor ; illustrated by Lee White

Publishers Weekly Agosin's rich, expansive novel, based on true events in Chile during the 1970s, covers three turbulent years in Celeste Marconi's life. Sixth-grader Celeste, surrounded by a loving family and lively friends, basks in the natural beauty of coastal Valparaiso, befriending pelicans, dreaming, and writing on her rooftop, which overlooks the harbor. Her idyllic life abruptly ends when a dictatorship takes over Chile, killing the Socialist president and removing his supporters-people like Celeste's idealistic parents, doctors who run a clinic for the poor. Classmates begin to disappear, her parents go into hiding, and Celeste is sent to a small Maine town to live with her aunt, where she struggles with homesickness, anxiety about her parents, learning English, and making friends. As Celeste slowly comes to feel comfortable in Maine, Agosin explores the relentless mixed emotions of having two homes especially well. "It's like I have one foot on Juliette Cove and the other in Butterfly Hill," thinks Celeste. The book's length and broad scope may intimidate some readers, but the realistically bittersweet ending is rewarding. Art not seen by PW. Ages 10-14. Author's agent: Jennifer Lyons, Jennifer Lyons Literary Agency. (Mar.) (c) Copyright PWxyz, LLC. All rights reserved.

(c) Copyright PWxyz, LLC. All rights reserved

...More
2014 (Middle Readers)
Josephine : the dazzling life of Josephine Baker
Click to search this book in our catalog   words by Patricia Hruby Powell ; pictures by Christian Robinson
 
2014 (Middle Readers)
Kinda Like Brothers.
Click to search this book in our catalog   by Coe Booth
2014 (Middle Readers)
Low riders in space
Click to search this book in our catalog   by Cathy Camper ; illustrated by Raul Gonzalez III

Publishers Weekly Camper's (Bugs Before Time) rocket-powered graphic novel stars a deliciously improbable trio: Lupe Impala, a beautiful mechanic with a mane of black hair and a limitless supply of automobile knowledge; Flapjack Octopus, whose eight arms can detail a car to a high gleam; and Elirio Malaria, a shady-looking mosquito who uses his needlelike proboscis to pinstripe cars with fantastic accuracy. Raśl the Third's dazzling art, done with red, black, and blue ballpoint pen, fuses the energy of Mexican folk images, the naked passion of tattoo art, and the antics of Saturday morning cartoons. Lupe and her sidekicks want to start a garage, but they don't have enough money. They enter a car competition (first prize is "a carload of cash"), find a beater, and plot their strategy: "”Y vamos a tener que echarle ganas, to clean it!" says Flapjack (Spanish translations are provided throughout). A wild journey through space gives their car one-of-a-kind galactic magic-readers will rejoice in their triumph. As a celebration of Latino lowrider culture, too, it's estellar. Ages 8-12. Agent: Jennifer Laughran, Andrea Brown Literary Agency. (Nov.) © Copyright PWxyz, LLC. All rights reserved.

(c) Copyright PWxyz, LLC. All rights reserved

...More
2014 (Middle Readers)
The Luck Uglies
Click to search this book in our catalog   Paul Durham ; illustrations by P tur Antonsson
 
2014 (Middle Readers)
Mikis and the donkey
Click to search this book in our catalog   by Bibi Dumon Tak ; illustrated by Philip Hopman ; translated by Laura Watkinson
2014 (Middle Readers)
The misadventures of the family Fletcher
Click to search this book in our catalog   Dana Levy
2014 (Middle Readers)
Mysterious patterns : finding fractals in nature
Click to search this book in our catalog   Sarah C Campbell ; photographs by Sarah C Campbell and Richard P Campbell

Publishers Weekly The husband-and-wife team behind Growing Patterns: Fibonacci Numbers in Nature (2010) demystify the concept of fractals, which mathematician Benoit Mandelbrot used to help understand complicated shapes in nature. "Every fractal shape has smaller parts that look like the whole shape," explains Campbell, with an illustration of a tree's dividing branches making the idea instantly clear. Elsewhere, an image of the airways, veins, and arteries in a pair of human lungs beautifully illustrates the notion of repetition in fractal patterns, echoed through figurative language: "Lungs continue to develop inside our bodies throughout childhood, growing like a tree to fill the space inside our chests." This fascinating exploration should awaken readers' powers of observation and appreciation for the intricacies of nature. Ages 5-7. (Apr.) (c) Copyright PWxyz, LLC. All rights reserved.

(c) Copyright PWxyz, LLC. All rights reserved

...More
 
2014 (Middle Readers)
A Moose Boosh: A Few Choice Words About Food.
Click to search this book in our catalog   by Eric-Shabazz Larkin

Publishers Weekly In his first book as both author and artist, Larkin assembles more than 40 food-themed poems that range from the political to the personal, pairing them with photographs that have digital doodles superimposed on them. Several poems take aim at urban food deserts, fast food, or modified food: a riff on Dr. Seuss is titled "Would You Eat Green Eggs with Dye," while another entry reads, "[I]f the corn is born in a lab/ instead of on crop land,/ and raised by lab coats/ instead of farm hands,/ is it corn at all?" (opposite the poem, an ear of corn is shown surrounded by mathematical equations and gobbledygook). But Larkin doesn't ignore the sillier or joyful side of food, either ("Sometimes.../ Chicken tastes/ sooo good, you may/ think that they are magical," opens one poem), and his sometimes whimsical, sometimes provocative artwork gives the poems added dimension and depth. Ages 10-up. (Oct.) (c) Copyright PWxyz, LLC. All rights reserved.

(c) Copyright PWxyz, LLC. All rights reserved

School Library Journal Gr 3 Up-Larkin presents more than 40 tasty, food-inspired poems written in the spirit of an amuse-bouche, or small appetizer offered by the chef before a meal, in this fun and innovative collection. Varied in style and tone-much like food itself-the witty, quirky poems take on many different topics. "A Desk Is Not a Dinner Table" pushes readers to consider the value in making time for a quality meal, while "Secret Meat," "Ashley Won't Eat It If She Can't Spell It," and "Food Doesn't Grow in Packages" will spark dialogue about where food comes from, who touches it along its journey, and what artificial elements it contains. The design is inspired, from the table of contents, which resembles a menu, to the photographs, which have been "vandalized" by Larkin with graffiti art, whimsically bringing each poem to life and giving it a voice (for instance, "Do It for Dr. King" is accompanied by a lush photograph of a spoonful of green peas, with a superimposed sketch of Martin Luther King Jr.). The author's note offers a sweet, journal-like description of how this title came to be written, designed in a variety of handwriting-esque fonts. Pair this collection with texts on urban farming, cooking, and the origins of foods, such as Hadley Dyer's Potatoes on Rooftops: Farming in the City (Annick, 2012) and, for younger readers, Jacqueline Briggs Martin's Alice Waters and the Trip to Delicious (Readers to Eaters, 2014) and Gerda Muller's How Does My Garden Grow? (Floris, 2014). This is a charming and original book that should start some quality conversation about food.-Andy Plemmons, David C. Barrow Elementary, Athens, GA (c) Copyright 2014. Library Journals LLC, a wholly owned subsidiary of Media Source, Inc. No redistribution permitted.

(c) Copyright Library Journals LLC, a wholly owned subsidiary of Media Source, Inc. No redistribution permitted.

...More
2014 (Middle Readers)
Neighborhood sharks : hunting with the great whites of california's farallon islands.
Click to search this book in our catalog   Katherine Roy
2014 (Middle Readers)
Nest
Click to search this book in our catalog   by Esther Ehrlich
 
2014 (Middle Readers)
Once upon an alphabet.
Click to search this book in our catalog   by Oliver Jeffers
2014 (Middle Readers)
Rain Reign.
Click to search this book in our catalog   by Ann M. Martin
2014 (Middle Readers)
Separate is never equal : sylvia mendez and her family's fight for desegregation.
Click to search this book in our catalog   Duncan Tonatiuh
 
2014 (Middle Readers)
The red pencil : a novel told in poems, pictures, and possibilities
Click to search this book in our catalog   by Andrea Davis Pinkney ; illustrated by Shane Evans
2014 (Middle Readers)
Sisters
Click to search this book in our catalog   Raina Telgemeier
2014 (Middle Readers)
A snicker of magic
Click to search this book in our catalog   by Natalie Lloyd
 

Back