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ALA Notable Books for Children
2016 (Younger Readers)
An Ambush of Tigers: A Wild Gathering of Collective Nouns
Click to search this book in our catalog   Betsy R. Rosenthal

Publishers Weekly While several picture books have tackled collective nouns, Rosenthal and Jago's collaboration stands out for the sheer inventiveness they bring to the subject. Rosenthal frames her rhymes as rhetorical questions that often make surprising (and wonderful) interspecies connections: "When a murder of crows/ leaves barely a trace,/ is a sleuth of bears/ hot on the case?" she writes as Jago pictures fedora-wearing bears snuffling around with magnifying glasses while crows flee, swirling past a luminous full moon. Witty delights abound as a shiver of sharks bundles up in winter knitwear and a bouquet of pheasants peers glumly out of a tall vase. Ages 5-9. Author's agent: Karen Grencik, Red Fox Literary. Illustrator's agent: Ronnie Herman, Herman Agency. (Apr.) © Copyright PWxyz, LLC. All rights reserved.

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School Library Journal K-Gr 3-Collective noun books have been multiplying this past decade, and this compendium of poetry stands out for its artistry and creativity. Each collective noun couplet whimsically describes a group of animals: "Would a labor of moles/wear polka-dot ties/when it goes to work/for a business of flies?" The laugh-out-loud illustrations depict the events described, often serving as strong mnemonic devices: a "rumba of snakes" dances; a "bouquet of pheasants" sprout from a vase; the ambush of tigers creep across the grass, tails curled high in the air, sights set on the horizon; and a "bed of oysters" literally rest on a bed, snoozing away. The writing is pithy, with an iambic thrum that make memorization easy. VERDICT This crash course in juxtaposition and imagination should be celebrated with a peal of bells. An inspiring addition to any poetry collection.-Teresa Pfeifer, The Springfield Renaissance School, Springfield, MA (c) Copyright 2015. Library Journals LLC, a wholly owned subsidiary of Media Source, Inc. No redistribution permitted.

(c) Copyright Library Journals LLC, a wholly owned subsidiary of Media Source, Inc. No redistribution permitted.

Book list Collective nouns for animals range from the humdrum and vaguely familiar (a pack of wolves and a string of ponies) to the colorful, off-the-wall, and hard to believe someone's not just making these things up (a bouquet of pheasants, a mischief of rats, and an intrusion of roaches). In this inventive picture book, 33 animal-themed collective nouns become springboards for the writer's imagination and the illustrator's creativity. Each double-page spread carries one or two rhyming verses posing questions related to certain collective nouns, such as, When a murder of crows / leaves barely a trace, / is a sleuth of bears / hot on the case? Rosenthal's logical pairings and absurd hypothetical situations are well matched by the dynamic digital illustrations. Jago uses structure, color, and repeated forms well, creating pictures that reward close attention with amusing details. An appended glossary brings all the collective nouns together, defines them, and asks kids to guess why each is well suited to the corresponding animal. A lively picture book with plenty of classroom potential.--Phelan, Carolyn Copyright 2015 Booklist

From Booklist, Copyright © American Library Association. Used with permission.

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2016 (Younger Readers)
The Book Itch: Freedom, Truth, and Harlems Greatest Bookstore
Click to search this book in our catalog   Vaunda Micheaux Nelson
2016 (Younger Readers)
Ballet Cat The Totally Secret Secret
Click to search this book in our catalog   Bob Shea

Publishers Weekly Tapping into the same barely restrained exuberance and visual energy that characterizes much of his previous work, Shea introduces Ballet Cat, a pearls-and-tutu-wearing feline who loves to dance as much as the author's Dinosaur and Cheetah characters love winning. The problem? Ballet Cat's best friend, Sparkles the Pony, may be getting a tad tired of "playing ballet" every day. Like Mo Willems's Elephant and Piggie, these two are a contemporary comic duo with staying power; Shea mines Ballet Cat's dialed-up enthusiasm and Sparkles's hangdog expressions for everything they are worth. Boldly contrasting backgrounds heighten the strong emotions at play and, luckily, after Sparkles reveals his "secret secret" about dancing ("Is the secret that you are not so great at ballet?" Ballet Cat asks concernedly. "That is not a very secret secret, Sparkles"), this friendship is undiminished. Ages 6-8. Agent: Steven Malk, Writers House. (May) © Copyright PWxyz, LLC. All rights reserved.

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School Library Journal PreS-Gr 2-Ballet Cat and Sparkles the Pony are great friends. One day, when choosing what to play, Sparkles picks making crafts. "Yay! Crafts!" says Ballet Cat, until she has second thoughts. She loves to leap and dance, and leaping with scissors is not a good idea. Then, Sparkles suggests checkers. "Yes! Checkers!" says Ballet Cat. But then she decides that their dance kicks might knock over the checkerboard. What about selling lemonade? "The lemonade will splash when we spin," says Ballet Cat. There seems to be only one activity that goes with leaping, kicking, and spinning. "We could play ballet," suggests Sparkles unenthusiastically. The problem is, they play ballet every day, and Ballet Cat is slow in noticing that Sparkles is not at all interested. Sparkles is acting glum and has a "secret secret," namely that he sometimes does not like ballet. He is afraid that revealing this fact will mean they are no longer best friends. But Ballet Cat has a secret of her own. There is something that she loves even more than ballet: Sparkles. In the last panel, they are happily playing checkers. This early reader has simple, vivacious cartoon artwork done in inks with digital enhancements. Shea's signature style and bright bold colors add to the fun. Although the text is somewhat sophisticated and the dialogue is entirely in word balloons, the humor and theme of friendship and sharing will have broad appeal beyond the beginning reader set. VERDICT Move over Elephant and Piggie!-Roxanne Burg, Orange County Public Library, CA © Copyright 2015. Library Journals LLC, a wholly owned subsidiary of Media Source, Inc. No redistribution permitted.

(c) Copyright Library Journals LLC, a wholly owned subsidiary of Media Source, Inc. No redistribution permitted.

Book list Ballet Cat and Sparkles the Pony are best friends, but even best friends sometimes have trouble finding something to do. Sparkles makes suggestions (Crafts! Checkers! A lemonade sale!), but Ballet Cat vetoes everything in favor of their usual activity: ballet, of course. The whirling, leaping, energetic Cat takes up much of the page as she dances, while in the background, a very deadpan Sparkles goes through the motions (Whee). But they are best friends, after all, and Ballet Cat can tell that something is bothering Sparkles. Sparkles is afraid to tell the truth: Ballet Cat loves ballet, and if Sparkles doesn't want to play, will she still want to be friends? Some of the humor and dialogue may lend itself more to an older audience, but the bright, monochromatic illustrations and Ballet Cat's wacky energy will attract kids as well. An appealing story about how even best friends can disagree sometimes.--Reagan, Maggie Copyright 2015 Booklist

From Booklist, Copyright © American Library Association. Used with permission.

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2016 (Younger Readers)
Beep! Beep! Go to Sleep!
Click to search this book in our catalog   Todd Tarpley

Publishers Weekly This book accomplishes two important goals: it's wonderfully entertaining, and it gives parents a well-deserved opportunity to tell their offspring, "Welcome to my world." A responsible-looking boy is trying to get his three robot charges-who, like their human counterparts, are full of beans at bedtime-to go to sleep: "Three little robots, time for bed/ Time to dim your infrared." Every time the boy thinks he has ushered them into slumberland, with the goal of getting some shut-eye himself, a new obstacle pops up ("Is something wrong?" "I need my coil!"/ "My sensor aches!" "I want more oil!"). When peace finally prevails, Tarpley (Ten Tiny Toes) and Rocco (Blizzard) offer another twist, best summed up as "Who's tucking in who?" The rambunctious robots will win readers' hearts from the title page, when they swing from a light fixture and bounce on the sofa. But the human hero is equally appealing: dressed in dadlike striped pajamas, he has clearly had an excellent role model when it comes to be being a loving and put-upon authority figure. Ages 3-6. Author's agent: Rachel Orr, Prospect Agency. Illustrator's agent: Rob Weisbach, Weisbach Creative Management. (Sept.) © Copyright PWxyz, LLC. All rights reserved.

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Book list A tousle-haired little boy is helping his three robot friends get ready for bed: Brush your rotors 'round and 'round. / Clean your shields . . . and power down. After some sudsy, puddly high jinks in the bathroom, everyone is settled in for the night the boy in a bed, the robots on a tiny metal bunk. But just when it seems everyone is asleep, the robots wake the boy with a boisterous BEEP! BEEP! and a litany of tiny complaints. Over and over again, the robots wake him with more requests until, finally, they ask for a story, which puts the boy to sleep. Parents will recognize this familiar bedtime routine, and little ones will chuckle over the cheery, toddlerlike robots' antics. Rocco's luminous illustrations are rich with glowing lights, lifelike depth, and saturated color, and his retro-futuristic robots are alive with vivid expressiveness. Tarpley's lilting couplets are a joy to read aloud, and the repeated interrupted refrain of three little robots are . . . will surely delight kiddos listening in.--Hunter, Sarah Copyright 2015 Booklist

From Booklist, Copyright © American Library Association. Used with permission.

School Library Journal PreS-Gr 1-A boy tries desperately to get his three robots to sleep. He leads them into the bathroom for rotor brushing and shield cleaning and finally settles them and himself into bed. But just as the snappy rhyming text suggests the robots are fast asleep, a page turn repeatedly indicates otherwise. "BEEP! BEEP!" bleep the robots as they report "sensor aches," the need for a light and more oil and a coil, and problems with a loose belt or tight bolt. Finally, in utter frustration, the boy issues an ultimatum: "No more blipping!/Blinking-boinking!/Winking-w-hirring!/Squinking-oinking!" Of course, they ignore him with a last request: "a bedtime story." Then no more sounds ensue, for the robots have "finally put/their boy to sleep." The illustrations, created with pencil, watercolor, and digital paint, greatly extend the text. The chaotic bathroom spread shows a robot entangled in toilet tissue as another overflows the sink with bubbles and toothpaste and a third sprays water well beyond the bathtub. The boy first rests with a wary eye on the troublemakers, yawns in hopeful anticipation of quiet, and finally lies spread-eagled in exhaustion. Alert readers will notice that a mouse, which has its own bed in the room, joins in the antics from start to finish. VERDICT A delightful tale of bedtime role-reversal that sharp youngsters will appreciate.-Marianne Saccardi, Children's Literature Consultant, Greenwich, CT © Copyright 2015. Library Journals LLC, a wholly owned subsidiary of Media Source, Inc. No redistribution permitted.

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2016 (Younger Readers)
Boats for Papa
Click to search this book in our catalog   Jessixa Bagley

Publishers Weekly Buckley, a beaver, lives with his mother at the shore. Papa isn't with them; what happened to him isn't revealed, but it's clear that mother and son are coping with a big loss. Buckley spends his days creating increasingly more elaborate boats for his father from driftwood he finds on the beach, lovingly launching each one with a note, "For Papa. Love, Buckley." "If it doesn't come back to shore," Buckley tells his mother, "I'll know he got it!" One day, Buckley discovers that all the boats have come back-and he learns something important about his mother's love as well. Bagley makes an impressive debut with this somber but never maudlin story about sadness, resilience, and an emotional coming of age. The pen-and-watercolor renderings of her two characters can feel slightly blocky and awkward, but it's a deeply empathic story with an accomplished sense of place. In beautiful tones of blue and brown, she immerses readers in the coastal world where Buckley and his mother are trying to make sense of their lives. Ages 3-7. Agent: Alexandra Penfold, Upstart Crow Literary. (June) © Copyright PWxyz, LLC. All rights reserved.

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Book list *Starred Review* A gentle storyteller's voice, in a soothing cadence, introduces the details of this simple, moving tale. Buckley, a young beaver, lives with his mama in a small wooden house by the sea. He clearly loves his mother. He also loves finding beach treasures and crafting boats from driftwood. Watercolor illustrations in warm tones range from expansive two-page spreads to full page and more intimate vignettes, capturing the quiet setting, the bond between the two, and their activities. Only one thing is missing: Papa. When Buckley makes a boat of which he is especially proud, he decides to set it adrift with a note to Papa. If it doesn't return to shore, Buckley will know that Papa has received it. Mama agrees; she misses Papa, too. Buckley builds many beautiful boats for Papa. It is only at the end of the year that Buckley makes a discovery: Mama has all the boats. The pacing is exquisite as Buckley absorbs and reacts to this information, recognizing and expressing love in return. These two will persevere in the tender journey of life. Reassuring, consoling, and lovely.--McDermott, Jeanne Copyright 2015 Booklist

From Booklist, Copyright © American Library Association. Used with permission.

School Library Journal PreS-Gr 2-"They didn't have much, but they always had each other." So begins this spare tale of longing and acceptance. Buckley and his mother (a pair of beavers) spend their days near their ocean-front home, gathering driftwood treasures, playing together, and having picnics in the sand. His favorite pastime is using his discoveries to make miniature ships to send out to sea with a note that reads, "For Papa, Love Buckley." He is sure the boats will reach his father if they don't wash back up on shore. He works tirelessly over the course of a year to create new and beautiful boats for his absent parent. One evening when he forgets his customary note, he runs back to grab a piece of paper from Mama's desk and discovers his ships hidden there.That night when Mama goes to retrieve Buckley's boat, the note reads, "For Mama, Love Buckley." Bagley's tender watercolors and lyrical text give weight and volume to a family's grief. Her portrayal of Buckley's hope and his mother's acts of love are heartbreakingly beautiful and authentic. The ambiguity of Papa's absence allows this story to transcend specifics and gives it a timeless and universal appeal. VERDICT The only thing better than this title for anyone who has experienced loss is the redemptive nature of time.-Jenna Boles, Greene County Public Library, Beavercreek, OH © Copyright 2015. Library Journals LLC, a wholly owned subsidiary of Media Source, Inc. No redistribution permitted.

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2016 (Younger Readers)
A Chicken Followed Me Home!: Questions and Answers about a Familiar Fowl
Click to search this book in our catalog   Robin Page

Book list A chicken followed me home What do I do now? Ever had that desperate feeling? Here, Page takes readers' questions about the bird and gives simple answers to each query. The questions she poses (from the viewpoint of a child) include the essential, such as what a chicken eats to general curiosities, such as how to distinguish between a hen and a rooster, how to determine its breed, how to keep the animals safe, will it lay eggs (and, if so, how many), and what if I want baby chicks? The answers are given in a straightforward manner using vocabulary a child understands. The book's bright, bold, colorful illustrations often cover a two-page spread and will draw in younger audiences, while older children will like the illustrations and be intrigued by the facts. Back matter includes more questions and answers about chickens and a short bibliography. A great book for families with backyard chickens.--Petty, J. B. Copyright 2010 Booklist

From Booklist, Copyright © American Library Association. Used with permission.

School Library Journal PreS-Gr 2-With a touch of humor, this well-designed title presents everything you always wanted to know about chickens-but didn't know to ask. The book starts with an unnamed narrator who's been followed home by a fowl, asking, "What do I do now?" After the hen eventually lays and hatches eggs and the chicks mature into adult hens, the child hopes that the creatures will "follow someone else home." Along the way, readers are introduced to information on anatomy, care, and life cycle. A question begins each topic ("Will my chicken lay eggs?") with keywords highlighted with larger, bolder type. Details are labeled or given small call-out illustrations. Digitally produced, the images are well integrated with the text and use highly textured shapes. Bright, solid color backgrounds alternate with white ones. Readers will find tons of fun and well-presented material; one page displays 260 eggs, the average number a hen lays in a year. A concluding spread of "More Chicken Questions" gives further detail and a list of more resources. VERDICT A charming addition to animal collections. Expect newly hatched domestic fowl enthusiasts to crow over this one.-Carol S. Surges, formerly at Longfellow Middle School, Wauwatosa, WI (c) Copyright 2015. Library Journals LLC, a wholly owned subsidiary of Media Source, Inc. No redistribution permitted.

(c) Copyright Library Journals LLC, a wholly owned subsidiary of Media Source, Inc. No redistribution permitted.

Publishers Weekly "A chicken followed me home... What do I do now?" begins this subtly funny guide to caring for chickens. The bird in question, a Rhode Island Red whose marbled swirls of red and black give the suggestion of feathers, makes for a handsome model as Page answers chicken-related questions. When asked, "Will my chicken fly away?" Page assures readers that "if you feed your chicken and give her a safe place to sleep, she probably won't fly away." Lightly irreverent in tone and design (dictionary-style inset images highlight various chicken food sources, predators, and coops), yet packed with information for urban and rural homesteaders alike, the book only leaves one question unanswered: Why did this chicken follow me home in the first place? Ages 5-10. (May) © Copyright PWxyz, LLC. All rights reserved.

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2016 (Younger Readers)
Detective Gordon: The First Case
Click to search this book in our catalog   Ulf Nilsson
2016 (Younger Readers)
Dont Throw It to Mo!
Click to search this book in our catalog   David A. Adler
2016 (Younger Readers)
Drum Dream Girl: How One Girls Courage Changed Music
Click to search this book in our catalog   Margarita Engle

Publishers Weekly A riot of tropical color adds sabor to the tale of Millo Castro Zaldarriaga, a Chinese-African-Cuban girl who dreams "of pounding tall conga drums,/ tapping small bongó drums/ and boom boom booming/ with long, loud sticks/ on big, round, silvery/ moon-bright timbales." Everybody in Cuba believes that only boys should play the drums, and her own father forbids her to perform, but the "drum dream girl" (as she's referred to throughout) finds her own drums, practices, and persists until her father relents and hires a teacher. Lopez's (Tito Puente, Mambo King) paintings fuse dream and reality as the girl flies through the air, drumming on the moon and making music with butterflies and birds; Engle's (Silver People) lines dance with percussive sound words and rhythmic repetition. Though an afterword reveals that Zaldarriaga later became famous enough to perform for Franklin and Eleanor Roosevelt, Engle focuses on her initial struggles rather than her subsequent career. A valuable addition to the growing library of stories about strong Latina women. Ages 4-8. Author's agent: Michelle Humphrey, Martha Kaplan Agency. Illustrator's agent: Stefanie von Borstel, Full Circle Literary. (Mar.) © Copyright PWxyz, LLC. All rights reserved.

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School Library Journal Gr 1-4-The award-winning Cuban American author has made her mark on children's literature with her powerful portrayals of little-known aspects of Cuban history, often shedding light on the Afro-Cuban experience. This work is inspired by the childhood of Millo Castro Zaldarriaga, a Chinese-African-Cuban girl who broke down traditional taboos against female drummers. López's luminous illustrations represent the island's diversity. Details of Cuba's and the protagonist's Chinese, African, Taíno, and Spanish roots are interwoven into the lyrical narrative and the vibrant acrylic paintings. © Copyright 2017. Library Journals LLC, a wholly owned subsidiary of Media Source, Inc. No redistribution permitted.

(c) Copyright Library Journals LLC, a wholly owned subsidiary of Media Source, Inc. No redistribution permitted.

Book list A talented young girl with a passion for drumming dreams of playing music in this upbeat story based on the life of Cuban musician Millo Castro Zaldarriaga. Told repeatedly that girls cannot be drummers, she refuses to give up, practicing in secret and delighting in every bit of music around her. A visit to an open-minded music teacher results in lessons and, eventually, the opportunity to perform in public. Vibrant, warm, and hopeful, this expressive story shows the power of perseverance and importance of following your dreams. Engle's prose flows easily, with clean but evocative language that will be accessible to a range of young readers. López's illustrations are lushly saturated with color, and the warm palette and bright tones transport readers to the tropical setting, while visible brushstrokes and layered colors bring depth to each scene. The text and illustrations work together beautifully here, creating a story that will imbue readers with inspiration and a yearning to make music of their own. An author's note provides some background on Zaldarriaga, the inspiration for this fictional story.--Hayes, Summer Copyright 2015 Booklist

From Booklist, Copyright © American Library Association. Used with permission.

School Library Journal Gr 1-4-Engle's spare, rhythmic text gets at the heart of the struggle to achieve a dream in this picture-book biography about a Chinese African Cuban girl who aspired to play drums even when society's double standards stood as a barrier. Growing up in tempestuous 1930s Havana, during a time when universities were often shut down because of their opposition to the dictatorial President Machado, Millo Castro Zaldarriaga dared to dream of playing percussion instruments-timbales, congas, bongós-but her father was adamant that "only boys should play drums." But still she persisted in her hopes and eventually, with the help of her sisters and music teacher, became a member of the renowned Anacaona, Cuba's first all-girl dance band, founded by her sister, Cuchito Castro. López's zinging, neon-tinged art highlights the island's diversity, depicting the drum girl's flights of fancy set against the backdrop of carnival scenes and outdoor cafes. Details of Cuba's and the protagonist's Chinese, African, Taíno, and Spanish roots are seamlessly interwoven into the lyrical narrative and luminous acrylic paintings. The alliterative text parallels the snappy syncopation of the subject's instruments. The heroine's tenacity in the face of naysayers will inspire all dreamers, and the illustrator's smile-inducing cameo on the last page emphasizes the universality of Millo's story. For those looking for more nonfiction titles about female musical powerhouses, such as Monica Brown's My Name Is Celia/Me llamo Celia (Cooper Square, 2004), Katheryn Russell-Brown's Little Melba and Her Big Trombone (Lee & Low, 2014), and Carole Boston Weatherford's Leontyne Price: Voice of a Century (Knopf, 2014). An author's note gives more background on the groundbreaking percussionist. -Shelley Diaz, School Library Journal (c) Copyright 2015. Library Journals LLC, a wholly owned subsidiary of Media Source, Inc. No redistribution permitted.

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2016 (Younger Readers)
Emmanuels Dream: The True Story of Emmanuel Ofosu Yeboah
Click to search this book in our catalog   Laurie Ann Thompson

Library Journal K-Gr 2-This powerful and winning picture book tells the story of a young man overcoming the odds. Born in Ghana with a deformed left leg, Emmanuel Ofosu Yeboah experienced stigma as a result of his disability: his father abandoned the family, and many assumed that the boy would be little more than a burden. However, with the encouragement of his mother, Yeboah refused to give up, hopping to school (instead of walking) and even learning to play soccer and cycle, despite receiving no extra help or accommodations. Thompson's lucidly written text explains how Yeboah cycled 400 miles in 2001 to raise awareness, forever changing how Ghanaians perceived those with disabilities. The narrative is simply and clearly written, and the illustrations are skillfully rendered in charmingly emotive ink and watercolor collages. A brief author's note explains how Yeboah inspired legislation upholding equal rights for the disabled and how he continues to make strides, working with organizations that provide wheelchairs to those who need them and setting up a scholarship fund for children with disabilities. VERDICT This uplifting account will resonate with readers and supplement global and cultural studies. A triumph.-Kathryn Diman, Bass Harbor Memorial Library, Bernard, ME © Copyright 2015. Library Journals LLC, a wholly owned subsidiary of Media Source, Inc. No redistribution permitted.

(c) Copyright Library Journals LLC, a wholly owned subsidiary of Media Source, Inc. No redistribution permitted.

School Library Journal K-Gr 2-This powerful and winning picture book tells the story of a young man overcoming the odds. Born in Ghana with a deformed left leg, Emmanuel Ofosu Yeboah experienced stigma as a result of his disability: his father abandoned the family, and many assumed that the boy would be little more than a burden. However, with the encouragement of his mother, Yeboah refused to give up, hopping to school (instead of walking) and even learning to play soccer and cycle, despite receiving no extra help or accommodations. Thompson's lucidly written text explains how Yeboah cycled 400 miles in 2001 to raise awareness, forever changing how Ghanaians perceived those with disabilities. The narrative is simply and clearly written, and the illustrations are skillfully rendered in charmingly emotive ink and watercolor collages. A brief author's note explains how Yeboah inspired legislation upholding equal rights for the disabled and how he continues to make strides, working with organizations that provide wheelchairs to those who need them and setting up a scholarship fund for children with disabilities. VERDICT This uplifting account will resonate with readers and supplement global and cultural studies. A triumph.-Kathryn Diman, Bass Harbor Memorial Library, Bernard, ME (c) Copyright 2015. Library Journals LLC, a wholly owned subsidiary of Media Source, Inc. No redistribution permitted.

(c) Copyright Library Journals LLC, a wholly owned subsidiary of Media Source, Inc. No redistribution permitted.

Book list Emmanuel Ofosu Yeboah was born in Ghana with a severely deformed leg, but with boundless self-determination, he became a world-renowned athlete and activist. In the beginning of her straightforward, free-verse text, Thompson only lightly touches on what it's like for disabled people in Ghana: Most people thought he would be useless, or worse / a curse. But most of Emmanuel's childhood is characterized by discrimination. When he tries to find work to support his sickly single mother, most people told him to go out and beg / like the other disabled people did. Stalwart Emmanuel, however, is resolute about making a difference, and he obtains a bicycle to travel around Ghana, nearly 400 miles in 10 days, to prove just how capable disabled people can be. Qualls' illustrations simple line drawings and stylish, expressive figures filled with layers of rich, warm color on pale, thickly painted backgrounds capture Emmanuel's triumphs beautifully. An author's note describes Emmanuel's activism in more detail, particularly the Persons with Disabilities Act, passed in Ghana following his bike ride.--Hunter, Sarah Copyright 2015 Booklist

From Booklist, Copyright © American Library Association. Used with permission.

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2016 (Younger Readers)
Finding Winnie: The True Story of the Worlds Most Famous Bear
Click to search this book in our catalog   Lindsay Mattick and Sophie Blackall
2016 (Younger Readers)
Float
Click to search this book in our catalog   Daniel Miyares

Publishers Weekly In the opening scene of Miyares's (Pardon Me!) wordless story, two pairs of hands-one big, one small-fold newspaper into origami boats. In the spreads that follow, a boy in a yellow slicker ventures outside and waits for a downpour to end before launching his boat, which is instantly carried away by the swiftly flowing water. It slips down a storm drain, and when the boy reaches it at last, the once-proud craft is a sodden mess. At home, his father welcomes him with a hug, then holds a blow-dryer up to the boy's wet hair. In an unexpectedly lovely moment, the boy grins widely as his hair blows sideways; readers sense his pleasure and relief. The warmth of his father's care renews the boy, and he sets off for another adventure. Skilled draftsmanship and smart pacing distinguish Miyares's visual storytelling. Seen against streets and houses of slate gray, the boy's yellow slicker is the only bright color, underlining the sense that he's in a world of his own. It's a moment of childhood captured in multiple dimensions. Ages 4-8. Agent: Studio Goodwin Sturges. (June) © Copyright PWxyz, LLC. All rights reserved.

(c) Copyright PWxyz, LLC. All rights reserved

Book list A young fellow in a bright yellow slicker has a great play day planned despite gray skies. In fact, it's even better after a downpour creates puddles and rivers in the gutters for the newspaper boat he has made. But after his boat slides down a grate and into the blackness of the sewer, he is despondent and trudges home. After he dries off and gets back to playing, his mood is lifted by more folding. All is well when he emerges from the shadowy house into brilliant sunshine, ready to fly his new paper plane. Using exclusively wordless pages in blacks, grays, and dusty whites, with occasional splashes of sunny yellow, Miyares movingly makes the little boy's every emotion crystal clear. Miyares' use of changing perspectives and page spreads that shift from panoramic views to series of smaller panels give the story a cinematic feel. With folding instructions on the endpapers, this will likely become a repeat favorite, particularly for little ones still learning to read on their own.--McDermott, Jeanne Copyright 2015 Booklist

From Booklist, Copyright © American Library Association. Used with permission.

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2016 (Younger Readers)
Flop to the Top!
Click to search this book in our catalog   Eleanor Davis

Book list My name is Wanda. I'm a superstar, announces the little girl as she starts snapping selfies with her pet Wilbur, a droopy lump of a dog. With fame on the brain, Wanda posts her pictures and in no time finds that her shots have 20 million likes. Delighted when news crews arrive, she is shocked to find that it's Wilbur who has charmed the world at large. No, I'M the cool one, Wanda insists, alienating her furry number-one fan. Following the canine celebrity to discos and yachts, though, she learns what it is she really values, both in life and in her relationship with her pup. Wife and husband Davis (Stinky, 2008) and Weing (Set to Sea, 2010) have fashioned a morality tale with careening energy that plays distinctively zany cartooning off a primary-colored, retro palette. Though centered on difficult emotions that will feel familiar to kids, the story is leavened with comedy, allowing readers to navigate comfortably even as the robust sentences and repetition massage new reading skills. Another fine outing from TOON Books.--Karp, Jesse Copyright 2015 Booklist

From Booklist, Copyright © American Library Association. Used with permission.

School Library Journal Gr 1-3-This is the story of Wanda, a celebrity-worshipping, self(ie)-obsessed little girl who thinks she's quite special-a star, in fact-and whose siblings and beloved dog are her most devoted fans (at least in Wanda's own mind). After she posts a picture of her floppy-faced bulldog, Wilbur, on social media, the image goes viral. Soon news vans and internet fans are on Wanda's front lawn, but it's not her they're eager to see-it's Wilbur. The pup is whisked away via limo to party with the glitterati and fellow Internet star Sassy Cat. Suddenly finding herself on the outskirts of her doggy's newfound fame, Wanda's in for a reality check. The petulant young celebrity-wannabe eventually finds a little humility, and her attitude changes. Lively cartoon art in bold, warm tones captures Wanda's frenetic energy, whose towering afro puff and wide-eyed smile will endear her to readers-despite her exasperating bossiness. Davis and Weing vary panel sizes and perspectives on almost each spread, lending the compositions an appropriately busy feel. Young readers capable of appreciating the irony of Wanda's tone-deaf interactions (for instance, a photo of Wanda smiling widely with her annoyed little siblings in the background is labeled "Starstruck!") will giggle when the protagonist gets her comeuppance and appreciate her eventual change of heart. VERDICT A chuckle-worthy tale for young comics fans.-Kiera Parrott, School Library Journal © Copyright 2015. Library Journals LLC, a wholly owned subsidiary of Media Source, Inc. No redistribution permitted.

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Publishers Weekly Davis (Stinky) and husband Weing have likely set a record for the number of selfies taken in a children's book with the introduction of Wanda, a self-described superstar who essentially sees herself as the next Beyoncé. With sienna skin and a hairdo like an exclamation point, Wanda considers her younger siblings and her pet dog, Wilbur, to be "fans," and she never misses an episode of The Star Show, which celebrates the hottest personalities of the moment (a spot currently held by "Sassy Cat"). After Wanda uploads a selfie featuring herself and Wilbur, it's her pet who goes viral, as news trucks and phone-wielding fans descend on the house to see "Floppy Dog." Hell hath no fury like a wannabe celebrity scorned, but as Floppy Dog is whisked off to dance clubs, expensive restaurants, and a yacht (with Sassy Cat, no less!), Wanda's anger morphs to concern and repentance. Chunky digital illustrations playfully spoof the lifestyles of the rich and famous (Floppy Dog is quickly adorned with sunglasses and jeweled chains), but Davis and Weing never lose sight of the story's emotional underpinnings. Ages 5-up. (Sept.) © Copyright PWxyz, LLC. All rights reserved.

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2016 (Younger Readers)
Flutter and Hum / Aleteo y Zumbido: Animal Poems
Click to search this book in our catalog   Julie Paschkis

Publishers Weekly In 12 tantalizing poems, written in English and Spanish, Paschkis shows herself to be a sensitive observer of the animal kingdom, as well as of language itself, finding humor, eccentricities, and unexpected connections in both. The two versions of each poem aren't exact mirrors (in English, a grazing cow enjoys a "Slow munch./ All day lunch," while in Spanish it's "Una comida/ sin fin"), and finding the intersections and divergences in the verse is a thrill. A sense of linguistic interconnectivity is also evident in Paschkis's warm gouache paintings, which (like her work in Pablo Neruda) features words painted on leaves, grasses, and swirling waters, reading like exercises in rhyme, alliteration, and word association (in a rainy scene, crows are painted with word pairs like crass/brash and bruju/brusco). Paschkis's imagery can be haunting, contemplative, or playful (a "dancing whale" becomes a "ballena bailarina"), and the results are uniformly excellent. Ages 4-8. Agent: Linda Pratt, Wernick & Pratt. (Mar.) © Copyright PWxyz, LLC. All rights reserved.

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School Library Journal K-Gr 4-An excellent Spanish-English collection of poetry on animals. In an author's note, Paschkis explains that although she is neither a poet nor a native Spanish speaker, she was inspired by the work of Chilean poet Pablo Neruda and that she began writing these poems in Spanish and then translated them into English. The Spanish and English poems are on opposite facing pages, with the artwork seamlessly sewing both versions together. Rendered in gouache, the folk-art inspired illustrations are at times dazzling with their use of color and subdued at others, as in the light, sage greens and grays of "Heron." Though Paschkis employs beautiful use of language in the English versions, such as her poem about a turtle who keeps jewels in her box ("When she walks/she listens to the rattle of the gemstones") and another about a dog whose wagging tail "fans wild happiness" into the world, the Spanish translations are marred by some awkward phrasing. VERDICT A book that takes wing and flies, flutters, and sometimes falters.-Teresa Pfeifer, The Springfield Renaissance School, Springfield, MA © Copyright 2015. Library Journals LLC, a wholly owned subsidiary of Media Source, Inc. No redistribution permitted.

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2016 (Younger Readers)
Gingerbread for Liberty!: How a German Baker Helped Win the American Revolution
Click to search this book in our catalog   Mara Rockliff

School Library Journal Gr 1-4-A little-known figure from the American Revolution era is given a fresh look for another generation of history lovers. This book relates the tale of a generous, beloved, and industrious member of the Philadelphia community, originally from Germany, referred to as "the baker." The book centers on his insistence upon joining the war effort, despite being told he's too old and fat. George Washington put the baker to work baking bread for the troops and eventually sent him on a special mission to convince the mercenary Hessian soldiers to abandon the English army. Rockliff's dialogue-laden text is accessible, even humorous at times ("General Washington did not say the baker was old and fat. General Washington was too polite. Anyway, he had other troubles on his mind."). Rendered in watercolor, the charming illustrations aptly depict the people and objects as gingerbreadlike, using a palette of warm, cinnamon tones and sugary white lines that detail the free-floating, cut-paper shapes. Repetitive shapes with a lack of depth complete the cookie illusion. The simple recipe on the end pages offers options for different skill levels. Back matter, including a list of sources, provides fuller detail and context as well as the baker's name: Christopher Ludwick. A sweet addition to Revolutionary War units where a more behind-the-scenes look is desired and a nonfiction twist on gingerbread-themed storytimes.-Carol S. Surges, formerly at Longfellow Middle School, Wauwatosa, WI (c) Copyright 2014. Library Journals LLC, a wholly owned subsidiary of Media Source, Inc. No redistribution permitted.

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Publishers Weekly Starred Review. Rockliff (The Grudge Keeper) and Kirsch (Noah Webster and His Words) pay playful tribute to a Revolutionary War hero whose legacy lies in his culinary talent. Just before the outbreak of the war, Christopher Ludwick emigrated from Germany to Philadelphia, where he set up a bakeshop specializing in gingerbread ("the best in all the thirteen colonies") and let no one go hungry: "No empty bellies here!" he booms. "Not in my America!" Ludwick shrewdly uses his baking skills after enrolling in Washington's army to feed both colonial troops and British-hired German soldiers, in an effort to persuade them to defect to the patriots' side. Working in watercolor, Kirsch takes a cue from Ludwick's baking to create characters that resemble gingerbread cookies with white icinglike details; speech-balloon comments add another layer of humor to the story. Rockliff's story celebrates an unheralded historical figure, reinforces the value of creatively employing one's skills, and reminds readers that heroes can be found in surprising places. A gingerbread cookie recipe appears on the endpapers. Ages 6-9. Author's agent: Jennifer Laughran, Andrea Brown Literary Agency. Illustrator's agent: Christa Heschke, McIntosh & Otis. (Jan.) (c) Copyright PWxyz, LLC. All rights reserved.

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2016 (Younger Readers)
Grandma Lives in a Perfume Village
Click to search this book in our catalog   Fang Suzhen

School Library Journal K-Gr 2-In this realistic story, Xiao Le (pronounced Shall La) and his mother travel to visit his sick grandmother. At first, the preschooler is afraid of the woman, but throughout the day they develop a close bond. Later, at home, his mother tells him that Grandma has moved into heaven. Although Xiao Le's reaction is extremely matter-of-fact and childlike, he has deep empathy for his mother's grief, reminding her of happy memories and meaningful symbols of Grandma's life. Eventually, Xiao Le makes the natural connection between his Grandma leaving and the idea that his mother might leave, too. "Then all of a sudden he thought of something very important, 'Mom, don't go there to have afternoon tea with Grandma! Just stay here and drink tea with me, okay?'" and his mom reassures him, "'Heaven is too far to reach by train.'" Connections with the natural world are ingrained in both art and text; the moon reminds Xiao Le of Grandma frying an egg in heaven, and the rain reminds him of her washing clothes. The beautifully rendered watercolor illustrations are warm, realistic, and deeply human, with images of animals and plants prominent in each spread. American parents may be alarmed when Xiao Le helps by feeding his grandmother pills, but this small cultural difference shouldn't detract from the overall quality of the story. VERDICT This is a refreshing contemporary meditation on death and grief set outside the United States. The gentle story and luminous illustrations make a strong addition to most collections.-Anna Haase Krueger, Ramsey County Library, MN © Copyright 2015. Library Journals LLC, a wholly owned subsidiary of Media Source, Inc. No redistribution permitted.

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Publishers Weekly Taiwanese author Suzhen writes honestly, even starkly, about the death of a grandparent and the suffering that precedes it. Xiao Le (he's very young, with baby cheeks and a beloved toy truck) hasn't visited Grandma in some time, and he's initially frightened to see her. Little by little, Xiao Le's fear turns to sympathy: "My truck will sleep with you, Grandma," he says. This is the last time he and his mother will see Grandma. Soon after, his mother tells him, "Grandma has left Perfume Village and moved into heaven." Suzhen conveys with tenderness the way Xiao Le understands his mother's grief and thinks of ways to comfort her: "Look, Mom, Grandma has turned on the light!" he says when the moon comes out. A wooden translation hobbles the story ("It had been a long time since he saw her"), but Danowski's (The Forever Flowers) exquisitely executed artwork redeems it, especially her intimate portraits of mother and son. While the book's audience is likely to be small, readers who discover it will find that Danowski's work eases its difficult moments. Ages 4-8. (May) © Copyright PWxyz, LLC. All rights reserved.

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2016 (Younger Readers)
The Grasshopper & the Ants
Click to search this book in our catalog   Jerry Pinkney

Book list A personable grasshopper wearing a straw boater and a leggy ant in an acorn hat square off over the joys of relaxing versus the honest pursuit of hard work in this familiar Aesop's fable. While an army of industrious ants scurry through the forest, collecting seeds and leaves for the winter, Grasshopper would rather sing in his own one-insect band. The color palette changes as the seasons pass, from the blossoms of spring, to the greens of summer, the rusts of autumn, and eventually the sparkles of first snow. Happy ants are inside their tree, while the foldout shows Grasshopper forlornly sitting on his snow-covered drum in the cold. The well-known moral? Don't put off for tomorrow what you can do today! Caldecott Medal-winning Pinkney's vibrant watercolors portray the lushness and beauty of the natural world in extraordinary detail while conveying the power of music through stunning visual art. Another winner to follow his other renditions of Aesop's fables, The Tortoise & the Hare (2013) and The Lion & the Mouse (2009). HIGH-DEMAND BACKSTORY: Pinkney's lush style and Aesop's timeless fables are an award-winning combination.--Gepson, Lolly Copyright 2015 Booklist

From Booklist, Copyright © American Library Association. Used with permission.

Publishers Weekly Fans of Pinkney's Caldecott-winning The Lion & the Mouse and his other lively re-tellings may wonder how he will treat this fable, which ends ominously for the grasshopper. They need not worry. He begins by populating a lush, leafy world with ants carrying food, giving the insects expressive faces while drawing them with scientific accuracy. The grasshopper, wearing a straw boater, performs on an assortment of musical instruments. "Why labor so long?" he chirps. "It's summertime.... Come join me in making music!" Autumn comes, then winter blows in; the grasshopper sits miserably in the snow, wrapping two sets of arms around himself to keep warm. He begs food from a family of ants, but they turn him away. A remarkable gatefold spread reveals the ants' underground dwelling, their stores of food and cozy woodstove shown in cross-section. While Aesop condemns the grasshopper's inability to put off gratification, Pinkney suggests that the world is better when everyone can follow his or her own gifts. The world needs good planners, but it needs artists, too. Ages 3-6. Agent: Sheldon Fogelman, Sheldon Fogelman Agency. (Apr.) © Copyright PWxyz, LLC. All rights reserved.

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School Library Journal PreS-Gr 2-Grasshopper arrives on the cover with bass drum and cymbals on his back, concertina between his midlegs, and forelegs strumming his banjo. "Why work so hard?" he sings to some busy ants. "It's spring and time to go fishing." But the ants, gathering food for winter, have no time to relax. In summer, the ants decline Grasshopper's invitation for a leafy picnic and some music, and his fall solicitation to "come dance and sing!" in the "playground of leaves" finds no takers. When snowflakes fall, Grasshopper builds a "snow-hopper," then sits freezing with forelegs and midlegs crossed over vest-covered abdomen, while the ants can be seen knitting, stoking the fire, and caring for their young in a cozy tree trunk home. Eventually invited inside by the Ant Queen, fun-loving Grasshopper gladly shares his musical talents with the amiable colony, then sits down to songs, tea, and cookies with the queen. Full-page vivid watercolor paintings bustling with natural activity and fanciful detail flow through the hues of the seasons, ending in the spare whiteness of winter. Fine line pencil-drawn strings and frets on his banjo, intricate snowflake shapes, the lace of a dragonfly's wings, and the colorful flow of musical bars all demonstrate Pinkney's painstaking concern with detail. So does the way a small bit of leafy scenery on the lower front flyleaf blends perfectly into the spring woodland greenery on the endpapers. VERDICT A lively and engaging version of a favorite Aesop fable.-Susan Scheps, formerly at Shaker Public Library, OH (c) Copyright 2015. Library Journals LLC, a wholly owned subsidiary of Media Source, Inc. No redistribution permitted.

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2016 (Younger Readers)
Growing Up Pedro
Click to search this book in our catalog   Matt Tavares
 
2016 (Younger Readers)
Hippos Are Huge!
Click to search this book in our catalog   Jonathan London

School Library Journal PreS-Gr 2-With gorgeous mixed-media illustrations and accessible, engaging language, this picture book will spur interest in the world of hippos. Trueman's vivid images take advantage of every inch of available space to convey the size of these creatures, and the "Isn't this cool?" tone of London's text keeps readers hooked. Two types of text appear on each page: larger print encompasses the main narrative full of fascinating facts (ideal for reading aloud), while smaller print presents drier statistics and additional facts of interest. With a focus on high-interest details-such as a spread featuring two bull hippos flinging dung at each other in warning-this title stands out. VERDICT A solid nonfiction read-aloud.-Kathleen Kelly MacMillan, Carroll County Public Library, MD (c) Copyright 2015. Library Journals LLC, a wholly owned subsidiary of Media Source, Inc. No redistribution permitted.

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Book list Illustrator Trueman emphasizes the book's title right from the start, with a cover illustration featuring the enormous, gaping yawn of a hippopotamus. This large format, eye-catching book is wonderfully designed for the youngest researchers and naturalists. London has chosen the facts most likely to interest kids, such as hippos' crocodile-crunching and dung-swatting capabilities (the latter features an illustration that will definitely prompt giggles). He uses two types of text: one with simple vocabulary in a large, dark print, and another providing more detailed information in a smaller, lighter font. Trueman's mixed-media illustrations seem to burst off the page in dominating double-page spreads, with occasional smaller drawings scattered throughout. Perfect for group storytime reading or individual enjoyment, this is also an ideal book for teaching reference and research skills to beginning readers. An easy-to-use index highlights simple vocabulary (e.g. fighting, speed, weight). Sure to be a favorite!--Rutan, Lynn Copyright 2015 Booklist

From Booklist, Copyright © American Library Association. Used with permission.

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2016 (Younger Readers)
I Yam a Donkey!
Click to search this book in our catalog   Cece Bell

Publishers Weekly Newbery Honoree Bell (El Deafo) creates a laugh-out-loud dialogue in the tradition of "Who's on First?" or Lane Smith's It's a Book. "I yam a donkey!" a googly-eyed donkey proclaims. A bespectacled yam objects. "What did you say? `I yam a donkey?' The proper way to say that is `I am a donkey.' " "You is a donkey, too?" the donkey asks. "You is a funny-looking donkey." The yam tries to educate the donkey, while the donkey demonstrates only hopeless thickheadedness. The appearance of a carrot, a turnip, and some green beans allows the yam to review conjugations of the verb "to be." The donkey, however, spies a meal. "Oh!" he cries, finally getting it. "You is lunch!" In a linguistic landscape where literally can mean figuratively and flammable and inflammable are interchangeable, Bell's story celebrates the idea that language changes, and pedants who can't adapt will be left in the dust (or in a donkey's belly). The ending sends a message that any child can endorse: "If you is going to be eaten, good grammar don't matter." Ages 4-8. Agent: Caryn Wiseman, Andrea Brown Literary Agency. (June) © Copyright PWxyz, LLC. All rights reserved.

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School Library Journal Gr 1-3-The cartoon illustrations of Bell's stab at eliminating a grammatical error are more engaging than her text, and it is probable that the intended audience will not grasp the lesson she's put forward. A donkey states, "I yam a donkey!" and a yam protests the improper use of the word yam. In the ensuing conversation, the donkey repeatedly uses yam when he should be saying am and the tuber becomes increasingly perturbed. Bell's drawings, done in china marker and acrylic, are lively and convey emotion through her judicious use of line, but the grammatical issue is less common now than in Popeye's heyday, and the joke goes on so long that it becomes tiresome. VERDICT Despite its inviting illustrations, this book misses the mark.-Miriam Lang Budin, Chappaqua Library, NY © Copyright 2015. Library Journals LLC, a wholly owned subsidiary of Media Source, Inc. No redistribution permitted.

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Book list A bespectacled yam and a donkey engage in a protracted Who's on First? discourse about grammar and identity until, well, it doesn't end well for the yam. Our officious yam means to teach the donkey a lesson about pronunciation (The proper way to say that is, I am a Donkey'), while the donkey, not the sharpest tool in the barnyard, almost willfully misunderstands, again and again (You is a funny-looking donkey). Eventually, a group of rubbernecking vegetables gets drawn into the argument. The yam conjugates them, by way of example, and the donkey has an epiphany: OH You is LUNCH The moral of the story? Some things are more important than others (If you is going to be eaten, good grammar don't matter). Bell's flat, jocular illustrations, with their heavy outlines and hand-drawn word balloons, fill the frames. Occasional panels structure the story's progress, but most of it happens across bright, simple two-page spreads. This irreverent, animated outing fairly begs to be read aloud, and children will demand repeat readings.--Barthelmess, Thom Copyright 2010 Booklist

From Booklist, Copyright © American Library Association. Used with permission.

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2016 (Younger Readers)
If You Plant a Seed
Click to search this book in our catalog   Kadir Nelson

School Library Journal PreS-Gr 2-A fuzzy, brown rabbit and a tiny notch-eared mouse plant tomato, carrot, and cabbage seeds and then wait for the plants to grow and produce. As they bide their time, the two sit in the rain, nap, and read books. Readers will notice the sky beginning to fill with birds, which the rabbit and mouse don't see until the fruits-or vegetables-of their labor are ready to eat. Then five winged creatures descend and look expectantly, in a priceless illustration, at the two farmers that try to protect their bounty from the intruders. A verbal argument and scuffle ensue until they all reach an understanding. After the seed of cooperation is planted among the seven characters, peace reigns and friendship grows. Nelson's charmingly realistic illustrations skillfully show the passage of time and humorously accurate emotions and body language. The textures shown in the fur and feathers and the small details in the large oil on canvas paintings create images for study (and framing). The message, so clearly read in the illustrations, is a universal truth-you reap what you sow and when shared with others, your joy will be magnified. VERDICT A timeless and delectable picture book choice.-Maryann H. Owen, Children's Literature Specialist, Mt. Pleasant, WI © Copyright 2014. Library Journals LLC, a wholly owned subsidiary of Media Source, Inc. No redistribution permitted.

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Book list A big-eyed bunny and his mouse friend plant a tiny garden, caring for their seeds, rain or shine, until they can enjoy their cabbage, carrot, and tomatoes. When a group of hungry birds shows up, the mouse and rabbit are unwilling to share, and their seed of selfishness grows into a heap of trouble. The tide turns when the little mouse finds an unblemished tomato and offers it to the avians. The birds return with sacks full of seeds, and the book ends with all manner of animals enjoying the fruits of an enormous garden. Nelson's sumptuous paintings are both naturalistic and expressive. The rich colors, low point of view, and realistic animal faces bring the reader right into the picture the lifelike plants are scrumptious enough to eat, and the sunny scenes glow with warmth. Though some may balk at the didactic lesson, this fable-like story with charming critters enacting a conflict that will likely be familiar to Nelson's intended audience is so gorgeously illustrated that it's a pleasure to read.--Willey, Paula Copyright 2015 Booklist

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2016 (Younger Readers)
Last Stop on Market Street
Click to search this book in our catalog   Matt De La Pena
2016 (Younger Readers)
Lenny & Lucy
Click to search this book in our catalog   Philip C. Stead

Book list An overloaded station wagon snakes through a dark wood, with a shaggy yellow dog and a boy named Peter peering from its backseat. I think this is a terrible idea, Peter observes. His dad continues to drive until they cross a wooden bridge and come to a stop in front of their new house, which is not nearly as good as their old house. Afraid that something terrible is hiding in the woods, Peter and the dog, Harold, build a large, pudgy man out of pillows and blankets to stand guard outside. This is Lenny, who is joined the next day by Lucy, fashioned from blankets and leaves. Soon, the unusual foursome is greeted by the girl next door, who comes bearing binoculars and marshmallows: the perfect ingredients for friendship. The smudgy grays of the illustrations match Peter's anxiety over the move, while bursts of yellow, green, blue, purple, and red shine like gems of hope amid his worry. A quiet, comforting tale of finding where you belong. HIGH-DEMAND BACKSTORY: Any book by this Caldecott-winning duo (A Sick Day for Amos McGee, 2010) is sure to garner lots of interest. Be prepared for eager readers.--Smith, Julia Copyright 2015 Booklist

From Booklist, Copyright © American Library Association. Used with permission.

Publishers Weekly Peter's new house is surrounded by dark woods, and he spends a long night worrying about what's out there. The next morning he gets to work, making a guardian out of blankets and cushions. Peter names his lumpy guardian Lenny and seats him at the house's wooden bridge, where he can keep the woods "on the other side where they belong." Concerned that Lenny might be lonely, he makes him a companion, Lucy. Readers watch as Lenny and Lucy take on life in Peter's mind, becoming the slow-moving, benevolent grandparents that he needs. (Peter's father is perfectly nice, but preoccupied.) When a brown-skinned girl named Millie appears-she has a plaid skirt, binoculars, and a better attitude toward the woods-Lenny tips his hat and Lucy glows; it's clear that things are looking up. Erin Stead uses faded grays for the alien forest and warm, quiet color for the story's living souls. What stands out is the Steads' (Bear Has a Story to Tell) ability to evoke the wordless intimacy and companionship that every child needs-and will make for themselves, if necessary. Ages 3-7. Agent: Emily van Beek, Folio Literary Management. (Oct.) © Copyright PWxyz, LLC. All rights reserved.

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School Library Journal PreS-Gr 2-Peter and his dog Harold are unhappy to find themselves on a journey with their dad through the dark woods on their way to a new home. Peter thinks the move is a terrible idea and if Harold weren't a dog, even he would do something about it. However, the decision has been made and Peter strongly dislikes the ominous looking trees that sit waiting darkly across the wooden bridge by the new house. The woods could be filled with terrible creatures. That first night, Peter and Harold cannot sleep. The next day, Peter takes action by creating a watchman, Lenny, out of pillows and blankets to guard the bridge. This is better, but something is still not quite right. Lenny needs a friend. So Peter and Harold create Lucy and the four become fast friends, making the home by the woods not so bad after all. Then they welcome Millie, who lives next door and likes looking for owls. This timeless story of a boy using his imagination to cope with loss and acclimate to a new environment is sure to draw in readers of all ages. The text is wonderfully imaginative and the mysterious nature of the woods lends feelings of excitement and intrigue. The illustrations perfectly match the mood of the tale, with the backgrounds created in cold grayscale and the characters popping to life with warm oranges, greens, and blues. VERDICT A wonderfully creative story of resilience and friendship.-Amy Shepherd, St. Anne's Episcopal School, Middleton, DE © Copyright 2015. Library Journals LLC, a wholly owned subsidiary of Media Source, Inc. No redistribution permitted.

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2016 (Younger Readers)
Leo: A Ghost Story
Click to search this book in our catalog   Mac Barnett
 
2016 (Younger Readers)
Lillians Right to Vote: A Celebration of the Voting Rights Act of 1965
Click to search this book in our catalog   Jonah Winter
2016 (Younger Readers)
Mango, Abuela, and Me
Click to search this book in our catalog   Meg Medina

Publishers Weekly Abuela has left her house in a sunnier place and moved to the wintry city to live with Mia and her family in their small apartment. Even though Mia and Abuela share a room, the older woman still feels like a "far-away grandmother" because her English is "too poquito" for Mia to speak with her. But Mia won't give up; embracing the role of teacher and enlisting the help of a bilingual pet parrot (the "Mango" in the title) she and Abuela are soon "full of things to say." With its emotional nuance and understated, observant narration-especially where Abuela's inner state is concerned-Medina's (Tia Isa Wants a Car) lovely story has the feel of a novella. Dominguez's (Knit Together) broader, more cartoonlike art initially seems like a mismatch, but she captures the doubt in Abuela's eyes, and her sunny colors and simple characterizations keep the story from sinking into melancholy before it bounces back to its upbeat ending. A Spanish-language edition is available simultaneously. Ages 5-8. Author's agent: Jennifer Rofé, Andrea Brown Literary Agency. Illustrator's agent: Linda Pratt, Wernick & Pratt. (Aug.) © Copyright PWxyz, LLC. All rights reserved.

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Book list *Starred Review* Mia is shy about meeting her grandmother, who is moving in with her from the faraway tropics. Abuela speaks Spanish and can't unlock the English words, and Mia's español is not good enough to bridge the divide they both feel. Soon they find ways of getting to know each other walking to the park, rolling masa (dough) for meat pies but it's not enough. Mia decides to teach Abuela English by labeling everything in the house (even the hamster!), and Abuela teaches Mia Spanish in return. One day Mia gives her grandmother a pet parrot, which they name Mango, and he becomes their student trilingual in English, Spanish, and parrot! Pura Belpré Award winner Medina (Yaqui Delgado Wants to Kick Your Ass, 2013) and Pura Belpré honoree Dominguez (Maria Had a Little Llama, 2013) have created a poignant tale of intergenerational connection, transition, and patience. The language and vivid illustrations (a colorful blend of ink, gouache, and marker) are infused with warmth and expression, perfectly complementing the story's tone. Abuela's adjustment to her new home is sensitively portrayed as she and Mia bond over their different cultures and shared heritage. Pair with Matt de la Peña's Last Stop on Market Street (2015) for another look at urban multiculturalism. Heartfelt, layered, and beautiful a must for library collections.--Chaudhri, Amina Copyright 2015 Booklist

From Booklist, Copyright © American Library Association. Used with permission.

School Library Journal PreS-Gr 2-Mia is unsure of what to think when her grandma, Abuela, comes to live with her. She must open up her room to share with Abuela, even though the two don't even share a common language. "Abuela and I can't understand each other" Mia confides to her mom. "Things will get better," she tells her, and indeed they do. Through some trial and error, persistence and even a feathered friend, Mia and Abuela find new ways to communicate. "Now, when Abuela and I are lying next to each other in bed, our mouths are full of things to say." In this tale, Medina blends Spanish and English words together as seamlessly as she blends the stories of two distinct cultures and generations. Dominguez's bright illustrations, done in ink, gouache, and marker, make the characters shine as bright as the rich story they depict. The glowing images of Mango, the parrot, a nearly silent star of the book, will win over audiences of all ages but the real magic is in the heartfelt tale of love. Everything about this book will make readers want to share it with someone they love. VERDICT A timeless story with wide appeal.-Megan Egbert, Meridian Library District, ID © Copyright 2015. Library Journals LLC, a wholly owned subsidiary of Media Source, Inc. No redistribution permitted.

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2016 (Younger Readers)
The Moon is Going to Addys House
Click to search this book in our catalog   Ida Pearle

Publishers Weekly Working in collage, Pearle (A Child's Day: An Alphabet of Play) sets delicately cut, classically proportioned human figures onto backdrops of striking colors and patterns. The effect is breathtaking. Pearle uses marbled paper in shades of pink and orange for the sky at dusk as Addy's family drives home after a play date in the city, and the moon appears to follow them. "Look way up high," writes Pearle, as the moon shines over the tall buildings, "and way down low," as it appears under a bridge. In her car seat, Addy twists and turns to see. "Oh, now I know," she says, as they drive over the last hill. "The moon was going to my house!" Pearle's portrait of Addy as she holds her pajamas out in front of her has the grace of a Renoir. A page turn shows her prancing with joy beneath the gigantic moon: "It waited to light up my nighttime dance." Pearle captures silky motion, conjures up a sense of warmth without reserve, and celebrates children's intuitive grasp of the natural world. Ages 3-5. Agent: Meredith Kaffel, DeFiore and Company. (July) © Copyright PWxyz, LLC. All rights reserved.

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School Library Journal PreS-Gr 1-The perceived movements of the moon during a car ride are a source of mystery and delight to children-and there is no shortage of picture books on the topic. Pearle, however, brings fresh excitement to this phenomenon with her dynamic cut-paper collages. The story opens at the end of a "play date." Addy and her sister have been building with blocks at a friend's home in the city. The pale moon is visible through the window and in subsequent compositions. As the family drives home, the girls play hide-and-seek with the orb, searching throughout the bustling neighborhood, under the bridge, and behind the mountains. Pearle employs a variety of techniques to maintain interest. A warm palette turns cool; paper choices range from the vibrant marbleized swirls of a façade to the wispy rice paper suggesting a cloud. Shifting perspectives include a bird's-eye view and a reflection. Particularly effective is the illusion of the scenery as a blurred stack of horizontal lines as the family rides swiftly through the country, windows rolled down, hair blowing about. The first-person text is sparse and childlike. The blank faces (except for a few slight, occasional lines, suggesting a cheekbone or eye socket), may strike some as odd, but there is much to recommend this spirited offering, not the least of which is the dazzling conclusion in which the pajama-clad Addy is shown in simultaneous succession. The spread captures eight different positions of a moonlit cartwheel. VERDICT A lovely celebration of a magical celestial companion.-Wendy Lukehart, District of Columbia Public Library © Copyright 2015. Library Journals LLC, a wholly owned subsidiary of Media Source, Inc. No redistribution permitted.

(c) Copyright Library Journals LLC, a wholly owned subsidiary of Media Source, Inc. No redistribution permitted.

Book list Summer bedtime is magical for a little girl returning from a play date. The moon follows Addy and her family home in their car, peeks through the window as she and her sister have a bath, and supervises their moonlit dance. The children watch the moon through the car window, trying to capture it with their hands, and the moon appears to watch them back in one marvelous aerial composition of red-winged blackbirds high in the trees and the road snaking far below. Cut-paper collage using a wide variety of gorgeous papers marbled, speckled, textured, and patterned lends visual interest to every detail, from a dachshund on a leash to a lady's miniskirt. Swirls and stripes give these illustrations movement and perspective, while intricate, precise cuts mimic back-lit foliage, windblown hair, birds, and architecture. Pearle's colors are vivid, almost psychedelic, in contrast to realistic human figures with contours straight out of Dick and Jane. A unique, fantastic combination of artistic materials, retro style, and endearing story.--Willey, Paula Copyright 2016 Booklist

From Booklist, Copyright © American Library Association. Used with permission.

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2016 (Younger Readers)
The Most Amazing Creature in the Sea
Click to search this book in our catalog   Brenda Z. Guiberson
2016 (Younger Readers)
Moving Blocks
Click to search this book in our catalog   Yusuke Yonezu
2016 (Younger Readers)
Mr Squirrel and the Moon
Click to search this book in our catalog   Sebastian Meschenmoser

Publishers Weekly Meschenmoser's story opens as a wheel of yellow cheese rolls off its wagon, hurtles off a cliff, and lands on a branch outside a squirrel's home. In the same sort of misidentification that drove Meschenmoser's Waiting for Winter, Mr. Squirrel concludes that the yellow cheese is the moon, and worries that he'll be fingered as its thief: "He'd be arrested and thrown in prison." A silent spread pictures the squirrel's fears with mordant humor as he appears in a small prison uniform, reflecting remorsefully as his human cellmate works on a piece of embroidery. (Further inspection reveals a miniature squirrel-sized latrine along the back wall.) The action heats up as a hedgehog, billy goat, and crew of mice join the fray (further crowding the imaginary prison cell of the conscience-stricken squirrel) until they can work out how to put the cheese back where it belongs. Meschenmoser's soft pencil portraits of the squirrel's inner fears teeter right at the sweet spot between anguish and humor. The story's deepest pleasure comes from the contrast between its ever-more-ridiculous scenarios and the artist's solemn, classically proportioned drafting style. Ages 4-8. (Jan.) © Copyright PWxyz, LLC. All rights reserved.

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School Library Journal K-Gr 2-This story starts before the title page and won't make sense if readers skip these early pages. Wordless drawings depict a large wheel of cheese falling from a farmer's cart and rolling off a cliff. The next morning, Mr. Squirrel discovers what he thinks is the moon perched on a branch of his tree. Worried that he might be arrested if someone finds him with what must surely be a stolen item, he gets rid of the moon by pushing it off the branch. Unfortunately, it lands on Mrs. Hedgehog and gets stuck on her back. A billy goat comes along and butts the moon with his horns and charges a tree. The goat spends the night attached to both the moon and the tree with the hedgehog still dangling. The next morning some bees and mice, obviously realizing the round yellow object is edible, munch away until it is just a sliver. The goat and hedgehog are freed, and the animals slingshot the moon back into the sky where they hope it will recover its original shape. The story is told in a wry, matter-of-fact style. The illustrations are mostly black and white sketches that contrast with the bright yellow cheese/moon. The book's droll sense of humor is marred, however, by three spreads that presumably come from the worried squirrel's imagination. These dark pictures of a man in jail are downright creepy and ruin the playful tone of the story. Readers should use their judgment when sharing this book with children.-Martha Simpson, Stratford Library Association, CT (c) Copyright 2014. Library Journals LLC, a wholly owned subsidiary of Media Source, Inc. No redistribution permitted.

(c) Copyright Library Journals LLC, a wholly owned subsidiary of Media Source, Inc. No redistribution permitted.

Book list When a wheel of cheese lands on a branch outside Mr. Squirrel's home, he concludes it is the moon and that he will be imprisoned for stealing it. He attempts to dispose of the evidence by pushing it to the ground, where it lands on Mrs. Hedgehog. Soon other creatures become involved in the caper: Billy Goat spears it with his horns, bees mistake it for a hive, and some mice make a good meal of it. Finally, they catapult the crescent-shaped remains into the sky, where it becomes the moon. Translated from the original German, Meschenmoser's minimalist text provides only a bare-bones story, while the illustrations black-and-white pencil sketches accented in color with a bright yellow cheese fill in the details. Some highlights: the two spreads leading up to the title page revealing the disc is really cheese, and a black-and-white scene depicting Mr. Squirrel (and his friends) sharing a jail cell with a solitary prisoner. This makes a good choice for story hours or one-on-one sharing.--Weisman, Kay Copyright 2015 Booklist

From Booklist, Copyright © American Library Association. Used with permission.

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2016 (Younger Readers)
My Tatas Remedies / Los remedios de mi Tata
Click to search this book in our catalog   Roni Capin Rivera-Ashford
2016 (Younger Readers)
A Pig, a Fox, and a Box
Click to search this book in our catalog   Jonathan Fenske
2016 (Younger Readers)
Piper Green and the Fairy Tree: Too Much Good Luck
Click to search this book in our catalog   Ellen Potter
 
2016 (Younger Readers)
The Popcorn Astronauts: And Other Biteable Rhymes
Click to search this book in our catalog   Deborah Ruddell

School Library Journal K-Gr 3-Organized by the four seasons, these 21 brief poems bring out the tastes of the year. Starting with spring strawberries and ending with a giant birthday cake, each selection teases out the most fantastical, delightful, and sensory elements of everyday food. The Strawberry Queen wears an "elegant suit-which is beaded and red" with a "green, leafy crown." Peaches have "flannelpajamaty skin" while raisins have the "enchanting taste/of well-worn pirate socks." The book includes a delicious variety of forms and all of the poems have elements of surprise and adventure. Even the baked potato-canoes will keep readers on the edge of their seats: "They oozed with steam and sour cream./They were loaded with bacon and chives./But silverware was everywhere-/and they barely escaped with their lives." The illustrations combine jerky lines and irregular proportions with soft, wet watercolor washes to create an absurd dreamy quality that brings even more fun to the book. Pair this yummy book of verse with this creative team's other fanciful poetry volumes: A Whiff of Pine, a Hint of Skunk: A Forest of Poems (2009) and Today at the Bluebird Café: A Branchful of Birds (2007, both S. & S.). VERDICT A must-serve in most collections.-Julie Roach, Cambridge Public Library, MA (c) Copyright 2015. Library Journals LLC, a wholly owned subsidiary of Media Source, Inc. No redistribution permitted.

(c) Copyright Library Journals LLC, a wholly owned subsidiary of Media Source, Inc. No redistribution permitted.

Book list The title poem, Popcorn Astronauts, provides an inkling of the curious descriptions of food captured in this collection by the same pair who created A Whiff of Pine, a Hint of Skunk (2009). The first spread offers a table of contents, listing the assorted poems 21 in all divided by spring, summer, fall, and winter. (Titles within a season appear in the same color type, which proves to be a useful visual clue within the book.) Pieces vary in length, scheme, and mood. Some are direct, such as 21 Things to Do with an Apple, a list that includes Wash it / Dry it / Apple-pie it. Some only seem straightforward, such as A Smoothie Supreme, a brilliant concoction that includes pickle, mud puddle splashes, and a nubbin of fish. Imagination rules in Welcome to Watermelon Lake! which offers small black boats for summer fun, while Dracula's Late-Night Bite will produce chills. Throughout, flowing watercolor illustrations depicting a mix of species and scenarios add to the surreal, playful effect. Use this to inspire unusual musings.--McDermott, Jeanne Copyright 2015 Booklist

From Booklist, Copyright © American Library Association. Used with permission.

Publishers Weekly The team behind Today at the Bluebird Cafe and A Whiff of Pine, a Hint of Skunk reunites for a playful grouping of 21 food-themed poems, organized by season and likely to be as crowd-pleasing as "The Noodles Nibbled Nationwide!/ The Famous Food Celebrities!/ The Couple That You Know and Love!/ The One, the Only, MAC and CHEESE!" (Ruddell knows her audience.) The author is similarly rhapsodic about guacamole and a smoothie of questionable ingredients ("A whisper of pickle/ is what I detect/ with glimmers of turnip/ I didn't expect"), but making raisins from grapes is another story ("let them go until they look/ like wrinkled rubber rocks/ and have the bold, enchanting taste/ of well-worn pirate socks"). Rankin's watercolors match Ruddell's whimsy and enthusiasm ounce for ounce, making for delectable reading. Ages 4-8. (Mar.) © Copyright PWxyz, LLC. All rights reserved.

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2016 (Younger Readers)
The Princess and the Pony
Click to search this book in our catalog   Kate Beaton

Publishers Weekly Beaton, whose "Hark, a Vagrant!" webcomic has won her a devoted audience, makes her picture-book debut with a story starring Pinecone, a Viking princess, and the dumpy, walleyed pony sometimes seen in her comics. The pony functions as a (very) blank canvas onto which other characters project their expectations; here, it's what Pinecone's parents give her when she asks for a "real warrior's horse" for her birthday. She's appalled, "but you can't say no to a birthday present, so she took the little pony to her room, where it ate things it shouldn't have, and farted too much." When it's time for the great battle, Princess Pinecone fears the pony will humiliate her. Instead, it melts the heart of Otto the Awful, the meanest warrior of all. "Awww, what a cute little pony!" he murmurs. Beaton champions a bouquet of affirming themes: strong girls, acceptance of difference, and battling with nothing more violent than dodgeballs, spitballs, and other related objects. It's a smart, brisk story that tosses aside conventional ideas of what princesses (and ponies) are "supposed" to be. Ages 4-8. Agent: Seth Fishman, Gernert Company. (June) © Copyright PWxyz, LLC. All rights reserved.

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Book list *Starred Review* Princess Pinecone may be the smallest warrior, but that doesn't stop her from wanting to be a champion! Her birthday is approaching, and this year she wants a horse perfect for riding into the upcoming battle. What she gets instead of a stately steed, however, is a short, fat, cross-eyed pony that farts too much. Pinecone tries to train the daffy little thing in time for the great battle, but it doesn't go well check out the fat pony cheerily on his back while a majestic knight fist-bumps his stallion in the background. But Pinecone perseveres, and despite her pony's shortcomings, they join in the great battle anyway. When they leap (or, rather, toddle) into the fray, Pinecone gets ready to be a fearsome fighter only to discover that her dopey ride melts even the fiercest warriors' hearts. Beaton's offbeat, colorful cartoon style makes great use of expressive brows, exaggerated figures, and huge eyeballs for maximum cuteness, and she stuffs each spread with hilarious details. Little ones will surely empathize with Pinecone's aspirations to be big and powerful, but it's Beaton's expert comedic timing that will rein them in for the long haul. The perfect combination of heartwarming and hilarious.--Hunter, Sarah Copyright 2015 Booklist

From Booklist, Copyright © American Library Association. Used with permission.

School Library Journal K-Gr 2-Rambunctious Princess Pinecone is the smallest warrior in her kingdom, but what she lacks in size, she makes up for in enthusiasm. Tired of receiving novelty sweaters for her birthday, Pinecone asks her parents for a big, strong battle horse-and receives a chubby little pony with a vacant expression, and incurable flatulence, instead. Though he doesn't fit the standard requirements of the typical trusty steed-"It's too small! It's too round! And I think its eyes are looking in different directions...(This was true, but only sometimes.)"-the little pony proves to be a surprising asset on the day of her great battle. Chunky, colorful digital illustrations provide plenty of detail to keep readers entertained; older children will enjoy exploring all of the different posters marking Pinecone's walls, or some of the sillier warriors in the battle fray, including one sneakily eating a hot dog. The text contains a healthy dose of alliteration and buzzwords that will boost vocabulary ("Pinecone was flabbergasted, flummoxed, floored!") while making for a fun read-aloud. VERDICT A highly recommended, charmingly illustrated tale of teamwork and tenderness.-Ashleigh Williams, School Library Journal © Copyright 2014. Library Journals LLC, a wholly owned subsidiary of Media Source, Inc. No redistribution permitted.

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2016 (Younger Readers)
Raindrops Roll
Click to search this book in our catalog   April Pulley Sayre
 
2016 (Younger Readers)
Red
Click to search this book in our catalog   Jan De Kinder

School Library Journal K-Gr 2-Originally from Belgium, this quiet yet powerful book addresses bullying. When a little girl notices her classmate blushing, her initial amusement turns to regret as a wink, a grin, and a laugh to the others make things much worse. Though Tommy repeatedly asks to be left alone, the children, especially Paul, continue to laugh and jeer at him. "Paul stares at me. 'Got something to say?' he gives Tommy a push. I shrug my shoulders and bite my lip. I don't say anything." The little girl shares her internal struggle to stand up for her friend versus her fear of the bully, whose "tongue is as sharp as a knife. And.fist is as hard as a brick." Yet, when the teacher questions the group, her fear is ultimately overpowered by her conscience. A wordless spread of angry, guilty, and ashamed faces all awash in red depicts the little girl in full color, bravely raising her hand. To her surprise, other hands follow-"Everyone saw what happened. We all talk at once. I can breathe again. I'm not all on my own." Though the bully confronts her later, the other children rally to her side. Using a palette of primarily red, black, and cream, the appealing cartoon illustrations are rendered in pencil, charcoal, ink, aquarelle, acrylic, and collage. VERDICT The tasteful, sensitive treatment of an important topic is sure to spark class discussion.-Barbara Auerbach, New York City Public Schools (c) Copyright 2015. Library Journals LLC, a wholly owned subsidiary of Media Source, Inc. No redistribution permitted.

(c) Copyright Library Journals LLC, a wholly owned subsidiary of Media Source, Inc. No redistribution permitted.

Book list *Starred Review* From the proliferation of red throughout this book, we know visually it has strong emotional content, and the cover, with a dispirited boy being gawked at by others, adds to its impact. This is a book about bullying. Tommy's blushing makes him a target, and he is depicted downcast and alone, tormented by others. Told in the first person by the narrator, the girl who first pointed out Tommy's difference, the story comes full circle as she musters her courage and stands up for him. While the text is sparse (and in red), as the teasing builds to a crescendo, the distinctive pencil, charcoal, ink, acrylic, and collage art dramatically shows events spinning out of control. Illustrations of classmates show primarily upper torsos and heads, as the bullying comes from laughter and taunting. As the situation worsens, classmates become animal-like: hairy, with teeth-like edges. The ringleader, Paul, is now a predator, all teeth, tongue, and claws. It takes two more pages of hesitation before that one brave red-and-white-sleeved arm is lifted in a sea of scowling faces, and the tide is turned. Pair this thoughtful, accessible story with Jacqueline Woodson's Each Kindness (2012) for an account of the regret that follows not standing up for someone else.--Ching, Edie Copyright 2015 Booklist

From Booklist, Copyright © American Library Association. Used with permission.

Publishers Weekly Belgian writer De Kinder watches as a child agonizes about whether to intervene when a bully torments her schoolmate. Tommy blushes easily, especially when people mention it, and the unnamed narrator starts the trouble herself: "You're... you're blushing," she says, pointing. Others join in: "Do it again! Do it again!" they taunt. De Kinder's brushed ink and gouache artwork makes plain the mean-spiritedness of their whispering. But then a boy named Paul pushes the teasing into genuine cruelty, laughing loudly and pushing Tommy. "I want Paul to stop right now," the girl thinks in desperation as the schoolyard wall and the buildings beyond take on the red of Tommy's cheeks. "I'm scared of Paul," she confesses. "What I want to do is scream really loud.... And yell that it has to stop. But I stay silent." When a teacher appears, the girl finds the courage to raise her hand ("Did anyone see what happened?"), an action that prods others to join her. "I'm not all on my own," she realizes. A useful opening into discussions about taking a stand when others do wrong. Ages 4-8. (Mar.) © Copyright PWxyz, LLC. All rights reserved.

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2016 (Younger Readers)
Roger is Reading a Book
Click to search this book in our catalog   Koen Van Biesen

School Library Journal PreS-Gr 1-In this enchanting Belgian import, bespectacled Roger, clad in a vest, a bow-tie, and a tweed cap, settles down to enjoy a book in peace and quiet. His reverie is repeatedly interrupted by Emily, an energetic youngster next door with loud hobbies-singing, drumming, juggling, and even boxing. With each disturbance, an increasingly irritated Roger knocks louder and louder on the wall, until in utter exasperation, he brings Emily a gift-a book of her own. When they both settle down to read, the story reaches its true crescendo-Roger's long-suffering dog demands to be taken for a walk, and Roger and Emily oblige. Van Biesen's mixed-media illustrations are somewhat reminiscent of the work of Chris Raschka and Vladimir Radunksy, but have a whimsical style of their own. Ingenious use of the book's gutter as the dividing wall between the apartments, clever changes in typography to signal sound volume, and the hilarious visual elements, such as the plight of Roger's basset hound, are but a few examples of Van Biesen's sophisticated use of visual effects. VERDICT This winsome story deserves a place in most collections.-Yelena Alekseyeva-Popova, formerly at Chappaqua Library, NY (c) Copyright 2015. Library Journals LLC, a wholly owned subsidiary of Media Source, Inc. No redistribution permitted.

(c) Copyright Library Journals LLC, a wholly owned subsidiary of Media Source, Inc. No redistribution permitted.

Publishers Weekly Belgian artist Van Biesen's fluid line, witty typography, and bits of photographic collage give this story an abundance of style. "Shhhh! Quiet. Roger is reading. Roger is reading a book," Van Biesen begins while a studious fellow in a bow tie and a tweed cap sits on a stool in his apartment, perusing a small volume. The next page reveals his neighbor, a small girl in a violet dress with a butterfly perched on her head; the gutter of the book serves as the intervening wall between their apartments. "Boing Boing. Emily is playing. Emily is playing a game." Emily bounces a basketball, whose multiple images convey the barrage of noise. He knocks on the wall grumpily, and the arms race continues as Emily switches to singing, drumming, juggling, ballet, and boxing. Roger's frustration grows until he arrives at a tidy solution-a book for Emily. The comic escalation of Emily's noisy pursuits, combined with delightfully unexpected details (Emily's toy giraffe becomes a lamp as she reads into the night), add up to a beautifully crafted piece of work. Ages 4-8. (Mar.) © Copyright PWxyz, LLC. All rights reserved.

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Book list It's a rainy night and Roger, a bespectacled chap wearing a sweater vest, is reading in his apartment with a basset hound at his feet. Well, he is trying to read, but his young neighbor Emily is making a racket: bouncing a ball, playing a drum, singing, and even juggling and dropping heavy clubs Each time Emily makes noise, Roger knocks on the wall that separates them and she quiets down for a while. Finally, inspired, he delivers to Emily her very own book. Now both can read quietly as the evening grows dark. That is, until a barrage of barking from the hound, who requires a much-needed walk, interrupts the silence. Simple line drawings are enhanced with bits of collage and bright washes of color. Enchanting details abound, such as Emily's butterfly hair bow and a toy giraffe that turns into a lamp. Belgian artist Van Biesen also has fun with fonts, giving visual flair to the playing, knocking, and barking. A charming story made even more so by the original, beautiful design.--Mazza, April Copyright 2015 Booklist

From Booklist, Copyright © American Library Association. Used with permission.

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2016 (Younger Readers)
Sidewalk Flowers
Click to search this book in our catalog   JonArno Lawson

Publishers Weekly A girl in a hooded red coat walks through the city with her father. He leads her home in silence, leaving her to contemplate the world. She spots flowers growing out of sidewalk cracks. Closing her eyes and sniffing each one, she accumulates a handful, then decides they should be given away. Viewers don't see what the girl does; instead, they see the results of her work. A dead sparrow on the sidewalk is left with a reverent bouquet on its chest, the gray scene around it flashing into full color. A man sleeping on a bench gets a couple, as does a dog's collar, and when the girl arrives home, the girl's mother and siblings receive a scattering of blossoms, too. When viewers last see the girl, she still has one flower, and she's still walking. If not for Smith's (Music Is for Everyone) intelligent ink-and-wash panels, his calligraphic pen line, and his delight in sun and shadow, Lawson's (Think Again) wordless story might have been mawkish. Instead, it's a reminder that what looks like play can sometimes be a sacrament. Ages 4-7. (Mar.) © Copyright PWxyz, LLC. All rights reserved.

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School Library Journal K-Gr 3-An emotionally moving, visually delightful ode to the simple powers of observation and empathy. A young girl and her father walk home from the grocery store through busy city streets in this wordless picture book. Along the way, Dad is preoccupied-talking on his cell phone, moving with purpose, eyes forward-while his daughter, a bright spot of red in a mostly black-and-white world, gazes with curiosity at the sights around her. In graphic novel-style panels, readers see what she sees: colorful weeds and wildflowers springing up from cracks in the pavement. She begins to collect these "sidewalk flowers" as they make their way past shops, across bustling avenues, and through a city park. Halfway through their journey, the little girl surreptitiously begins giving pieces of her bouquet away: a dandelion and some daffodils to a dead bird on a pathway; a sprig of lilac to an older man sleeping on a bench; daisies in the hair of her mother and siblings. With each not-so-random act of kindness, the scenes fill with more and more color, until the pen-and-ink drawings are awash in watercolor, her world now fully alive and vibrant. With pitch-perfect visual pacing, the narrative unfolds slowly, matched by the protagonist's own leisurely appreciation of her environment. Smith expertly varies perspective, switching from bird's-eye view to tightly focused close-ups. The panel format is used exquisitely; the individual choices are purposeful, and the spaces between panels effectively move the story. VERDICT This is a book to savor slowly and then revisit again and again.-Kiera Parrott, School Library Journal (c) Copyright 2015. Library Journals LLC, a wholly owned subsidiary of Media Source, Inc. No redistribution permitted.

(c) Copyright Library Journals LLC, a wholly owned subsidiary of Media Source, Inc. No redistribution permitted.

Book list *Starred Review* A little girl in a red hooded jacket is walking with her dad on a gray street, but once she spots some dandelions growing out of a crack in the sidewalk, she starts to see wildflowers all over. Each time she notices some flowers, her father waits as she expands her bouquet. Now with a fistful of treasures, the girl decides to spread the cheer around. She places a few stems on a dead bird in the park, leaves some at the foot of a napping man, nestles a few in a dog's collar, weaves several into her mom's hair, and balances a few more atop her brother's head before tucking the last one behind her ear. Smith expertly lays out the heartening narrative in wordless panels full of loose yet expressive ink-and-watercolor illustrations that subtly and lovingly capture the little girl's joyful, breezy discovery of the wealth of color and nature around her. At first, the girl is the only speck of color in a world of inky black washes, but as she begins to notice flowers and birds all over town, Smith fills in her environment with rich and varied hues. A quiet, graceful book about the perspective-changing wonder of humble, everyday pleasures.--Hunter, Sarah Copyright 2015 Booklist

From Booklist, Copyright © American Library Association. Used with permission.

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2016 (Younger Readers)
The Skunk
Click to search this book in our catalog   JMac Barnett
2016 (Younger Readers)
Special Delivery
Click to search this book in our catalog   Philip C. Stead
2016 (Younger Readers)
Supertruck
Click to search this book in our catalog   Stephen Savage

Book list *Starred Review* Let's face it. Some trucks get all the glory, rushing about to repair a sparking power line, put out a fire, or tow a stranded school bus. Meanwhile, the lowly garbage truck goes about his work, collecting trash and hauling it away. But when a blizzard immobilizes the city and even the important bucket truck, fire engine, and tow truck can't get through the snow, the garbage truck adds a plow and becomes SUPERTRUCK, digging out the streets. The next day, he is back to his old job, collecting the garbage while the other vehicles wonder about the mighty truck who saved them. The short, pithy text is paired with beautifully composed illustrations in which clean lines, blocks of color, and effectively used textures create varied, evocative city scenes. Best known for illustrating picture books such as Lauren Thompson's Polar Bear Night (2004) and his own Where's Walrus? (2011), Savage makes the trucks into vivid characters by adding simple facial features. He also gives the intrepid garbage truck big black glasses, which go missing when he goes into super mode, suggesting Clark Kent's classic transformation into Superman. Just right for winter storytimes, this winning picture book will find an appreciative audience beyond just young truck-lovers.--Phelan, Carolyn Copyright 2015 Booklist

From Booklist, Copyright © American Library Association. Used with permission.

Publishers Weekly In a city "full of brave trucks," writes Savage (Little Tug), the green bucket truck, red fire truck, and blue tow truck spend their days rescuing this and fixing that, all with can-do smiles. But the nebbishy, bespectacled garbage truck? He's not only colorless, "He just collects the trash." Of course, Clark Kent flew under the radar, too-and, sure enough, when a blizzard hits, that very same garbage truck emerges from his garage as the snow-plowing Supertruck. He "digs out the whole city" (as well as his snazzier counterparts), only to disappear without waiting for thanks: "The next morning, the trucks wonder about the mighty truck who saved them. Where could he be?" Savage's take on the superhero myth is terrific: there's no bullying or teasing of the garbage truck, which makes his Supertruck transformation a triumph pure and simple. And the images are as fun as they are gorgeous: Savage's vehicles exude a Golden Book sweetness, while his city scenes have both a crisp stylishness and an emotional punch. Ages 2-6. Agent: Brenda Bowen, Sanford J. Greenburger Associates. (Jan.) © Copyright PWxyz, LLC. All rights reserved.

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School Library Journal PreS-K-Superpowers and vehicles collide in this tale of an unassuming garbage truck and his own alter ego. All city trucks have a mission; whether it's rescuing broken down buses, or fighting fires, they all help to save the day. One blustery evening when the snow piles up, the bespectacled garbage truck sneaks away to transform into Supertruck. In secret, he plows all the falling snow overnight but vanishes the next morning without a trace. The city dwellers and other four wheelers are all safe thanks to the powers of Supertruck. Savage creates an appealing hero that echoes another beloved character with a secret identity. Kids will chuckle at the truck's likeness to Clark Kent, and the minimal text will assist emerging readers in their own super abilities. Savage's distinct, graphic portrayal of the snowy metropolis sets the scene, while his use of perspective and color gradients allow readers to experience the blizzard firsthand. A superb addition to any library or storytime collection.-Claire Moore, Darien Library, CT (c) Copyright 2015. Library Journals LLC, a wholly owned subsidiary of Media Source, Inc. No redistribution permitted.

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2016 (Younger Readers)
Swan: The Life and Dance of Anna Pavlova
Click to search this book in our catalog   Laurel Snyder

School Library Journal Gr 1-4-This tall, graceful picture book captures the artistic spirit, if not the entire biography, of one of the world's prima ballerinas. Pavlova's humble beginnings and early life in 19th-century tsarist Russia are merely hinted at, though spelled out more fully in an appended author's note. The spare, lyrical text instead offers imagery that is more poetic than concrete. For example, when the curtain rises on Pavlova: "She steps onto the stage alone./and sprouts white wings, a swan./She weaves the notes, the very air/into a story./Anna is a bird in flight,/a whim of wind and water./Quiet feathers in a big loud world./Anna is the swan." Morstad's artwork-done in ink, gouache, graphite, pencil, and crayon-is stylized and understated, with backdrops that suggest stage sets more than landscapes or domestic scenes. On nearly every page, the lithe and lovely figure of Pavlova appears, usually in motion, always the embodiment of beauty and grace. Even her illness and death are presented in a dramatic, theatrical manner-fitting somehow for someone who lived and breathed the stage. VERDICT An enchanting glimpse of a dancer whose name has come to be synonymous with her most famous role.-Luann Toth, School Library Journal © Copyright 2015. Library Journals LLC, a wholly owned subsidiary of Media Source, Inc. No redistribution permitted.

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Book list The daughter of a laundress, young Anna Pavlova had few opportunities to see ballet, but they were enough to fill her with wonder and an unwavering longing to dance. Written in spare, evocative text, the narrative follows Anna's life as she studies at the Imperial Ballet School, becomes a beloved famous dancer, and travels the world to share her love of ballet. The graceful illustrations illuminate the text and capture Pavlova's essence beautifully. Simple line drawings evoke an earlier age, and Morstad deftly uses fine details to capture the time period. Thoughtful palette choices mirror tone and setting: the bright colors of India, the drab surroundings of her childhood apartment, and the rich but subdued curtains of the stage. The author takes special care to emphasize Anna's belief that hard work is the foundation of success, but also that ballet was for everyone, not just the elite. The author's note sheds light on Pavlova's motivation and includes fascinating tidbits about dancers' lives in Russia. A short bibliography is also included.--Hayes, Summer Copyright 2016 Booklist

From Booklist, Copyright © American Library Association. Used with permission.

Publishers Weekly In spare, verselike prose, Snyder follows the life of Russian ballerina Anna Pavlova from her artistic awakening as a dancer to the height of her fame and her death in 1931. Morstad gives Pavlova the grace of a porcelain doll, whether she is dancing as she hangs clothing on a line ("Shirt, shirt, laundry./ Shirt, shirt, laundry"), honing her craft after being admitted to the Imperial Ballet School, or performing her signature role in The Dying Swan. Snyder emphasizes Pavlova's determination and hard work throughout, as well as her belief that "ballet was for everyone" ("When people throw flowers, Anna tosses them back"). An author's note expands on biographical details hinted at in this tender, delicate recounting. Ages 5-8. Author's agent: Tina Wexler, ICM. Illustrator's agent: Emily van Beek, Folio Literary Management. (Aug.) © Copyright PWxyz, LLC. All rights reserved.

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2016 (Younger Readers)
Tiptoe Tapirs
Click to search this book in our catalog   Hanmin Kim

Publishers Weekly Distinctively stylized paintings distinguish this cautionary tale from South Korean author-illustrator Kim. Set "long ago in a jungle where many animals lived," the story introduces Tapir and Little Tapir, who are quiet and cautious by nature ("Tiptoe, tiptoe. They were careful not to step on an ant"). This alone isn't enough to keep them safe, however. In a frightening sequence, an orange leopard with needlelike teeth and hooked claws tears through the jungle after them. Just as suddenly, a new danger reveals itself: "Bang! Bang! Bang!" blasts a hunter's shotgun as three round bursts explode just over the animals' heads. Following the tapirs' tiptoeing example allows the leopard and his intended prey to survive. Intriguing details await careful readers (is that Kim himself tiptoeing behind his tapir heroes on the inside front cover?), and the inky silhouetted vegetation and animals' vacant, ghostlike eyes both help establish a sense of the jungle as a mysterious, unpredictable place. But while readers are left with the assurance that the hunter "left the jungle, never to return," the violent encounter casts a lingering pall. Ages 4-8. (Oct.) © Copyright PWxyz, LLC. All rights reserved.

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School Library Journal K-Gr 2-Even in the peaceful jungle, you can hear the "BOOM-BOOM" of an elephant, the "BAM-BAM" of a rhinoceros, the "CAW-CAW" of a hornbill, and the "HOO-HAA-HOO-HAA" of an ape. But you can't hear Tapir and her little one. Ever silent and ever gentle, two tiptoeing tapirs take center stage in this retelling of a classic pourquoi tale. The thought of delicious mud cakes inspires the tapir pair to walk silently through the jungle, past the waterfall and along the river to the Great Puddle. When they reach their destination, they are pleased to see plenty of mud, when, suddenly..."THUD, THUD, THUD...GROWL!" Out of nowhere, a leopard attacks! With the softest steps, the tapirs try to escape. Just as the leopard has the tapirs in his clutches, a hunter's shotgun fires. "BANG! BANG! BANG!" Now the leopard must escape! With a "hush, hush," Tapir and Little Tapir show the leopard how to tiptoe to safety. Rich, traditional, and somewhat meditative watercolor-style artwork graces each page, while perfectly timed sounds and alliterations add to the suspense of the story. Rhymes and animal sounds make this an ideal choice for an action-based read-aloud. VERDICT This delightful tale effortlessly supplements most picture book collections.-Natalie Braham, Denver Public Library © Copyright 2015. Library Journals LLC, a wholly owned subsidiary of Media Source, Inc. No redistribution permitted.

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Book list This translation of a picture book originally published in South Korea offers a hopeful pourquoi story made unusual by its setting, Southeast Asia, and its stars, Tapir and Little Tapir. Kim presents them as quiet creatures in a jungle of noisy animals. A rhythmic, repetitive text uses onomatopoeia to capture the cacophony BOOM-BOOM, BAM-BAM, CAW-CAW and contrasts it with Tapir and Little Tapir's Tiptoe, tiptoe, and Hush, hush, hush. They are adorably rendered in watercolor washes with big blank eyes that make them look guileless. Children familiar with this kind of tale will not be surprised by an element of danger. Here, a fierce orange leopard chases them. What may, however, shock some is that a worse threat is yet to come a human hunting the leopard: BANG! BANG! BANG! The gentle tapirs teach the leopard to walk softly and escape, ending the tale on a happy note: once all the animals are quiet, the hunter leaves, never to return. Students following current events involving big-game hunting may wish to compare this tale with Hamilton's He Lion, Bruh Bear, and Bruh Rabbit (The People Could Fly, 1985).--McDermott, Jeanne Copyright 2016 Booklist

From Booklist, Copyright © American Library Association. Used with permission.

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2016 (Younger Readers)
Trombone Shorty
Click to search this book in our catalog   Troy Andrews
 
2016 (Younger Readers)
Two Mice
Click to search this book in our catalog   Sergio Ruzzier

Publishers Weekly In a book with the rhythms, if not the precise goals, of a counting book, Ruzzier (A Letter to Leo) follows two white mice into and out of several small predicaments. Like an undulating wave, two-word lines count from one to three, down to one, up to three again, and so on. The opening sequence ("One house/ Two mice/ Three cookies") introduces a frisson of tension as one mouse frowns at its single cookie while the other (identifiable by brown spots on its back) greedily devours two treats. The tables turn during the next sequence ("Three boats/ Two oars/ One rower") as the spotted mouse gets stuck piloting their rowboat, and the other relaxes. After "one shipwreck" and a close encounter with "three beaks" belonging to a nestful of baby birds, the mice find their way home for a soup dinner. The small dimensions of the book (not to mention its heroes), the reassuring patterns of Ruzzier's text, and the surrealist edge common to his artwork create an adventure with a scintillating combination of danger and comfort. Ages 4-7. Agent: Jennifer Laughran, Andrea Brown Literary Agency. (Sept.) © Copyright PWxyz, LLC. All rights reserved.

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School Library Journal PreS-Gr 1-"One house/Two mice/Three cookies./Three boats/Two oars/One rower." Counting up to three and down to one again and again forms the structure and narrative of this slim story. Pen-and-ink illustrations show two mouse friends-sometimes naughty, sometimes grumpy, always together-having an adventure involving a shipwreck, danger, and the perfect pot of soup. The counting device, forward and backward, may confuse some children, while others will enjoy the simplicity and rhythm. VERDICT An unusual but sweetly satisfying offering, this title will be a lively addition to most libraries.-Martha Link Yesowitch, Charlotte Mecklenburg Library, NC © Copyright 2015. Library Journals LLC, a wholly owned subsidiary of Media Source, Inc. No redistribution permitted.

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2016 (Younger Readers)
Wait
Click to search this book in our catalog   Antoinette Portis

School Library Journal PreS-K-The conflicting agendas of a mother and preschooler play out in this classic scenario depicting a leisurely/rushed walk to the bus. Two of only three words employed in the text form a call-and-response pattern. Naturally it is the adult who admonishes, "Hurry!" The protagonist wants to greet a friendly dog, wave to the cement truck worker, and feed the ducks in the park. Portis's signature black outlines surrounding the people, creatures, and objects offer a pleasing clarity that contrasts with the softer, more amorphous backgrounds. Rendered in charcoal, ink, and pencil, with digital coloring, these scenes provide ample opportunity to follow the boy's lead, pausing to notice details, count things, and discuss colors, shapes, and signs. There is much to notice, such as the ladybug perched on the title page's "t"-drawing attention to the titular word itself. The insect or a replica of its form appears in surprising spots as the book progresses, as do other visual threads. One delightful scene places readers inside a tropical fish shop peering through an aquarium; the view aligns a fish's eye with the boy's. Pacing varies, controlled by perspective and the number of pages between words. After the mother exclaims, "Hurry!" three times in a row, as showers fall, the pair reach the bus. The imploring child gets the "Yes. Wait." he has longed for, however, when his parent notices the double rainbow. VERDICT Portis has a gift for creating rich visual narratives for young children; this one will resonate with their caretakers, too.-Wendy Lukehart, District of Columbia Public Library © Copyright 2015. Library Journals LLC, a wholly owned subsidiary of Media Source, Inc. No redistribution permitted.

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Publishers Weekly Portis (Froodle) examines the push-and-pull between a parent who wants to get where she's going and a boy whose journey is all about discovery. The two figures are drawn with thick black lines, and their light brown skin and dark hair give them a universal appearance. "Hurry," the boy's mother says, looking at her watch; they have a train to catch. The storefronts they pass are brick, and the buildings they pass could be five years old, or 50. The boy looks behind him and sees a woman walking a dachshund. "Wait," he says, holding out the back of his hand for the dog to sniff. "Hurry!" his mother repeats. "Wait," the boy says again, this time at the sight of a cement mixer spilling cement on the road. On they go, the alternating words "Hurry" and "Wait" the story's only text until, right at the door of the train, the boy spies something so lovely that his mother has to agree: "Yes. Wait." Economy and affection give this story the dimensions of a classic. Ages 3-7. Agent: Deborah Warren, East/West Literary. (July) © Copyright PWxyz, LLC. All rights reserved.

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2016 (Younger Readers)
Water Is Water: A Book About the Water Cycle
Click to search this book in our catalog   Miranda Paul

Book list In this gentle and very cleverly rhymed book, basics of the water cycle are conveyed through what otherwise looks and feels like a narrative picture book. An effortlessly multicultural cast of kids floats, darts, and dallies through various seasons of the year, while Paul uses each spread to introduce the next phase of water. Example: Misty. / Twisty. / Where is the town? / Fog is fog unless . . . page turn it falls down. / Patter. / Splatter. / What is that sound? / Rain is rain unless . . . You rather want to know how the line ends, don't you? This excellent rhythm, which often uses ideas and images beyond what you'd expect, is matched by Chin's playful, soft-hued, but always realistic watercolor-and-gouache paintings. Chin is especially adept at portraying light sources, whether they be an early morning glow through kitchen windows, a foggy street through which a school bus creeps, or the blinding golds of autumn sunshine through leaves. A two-page section at the back supplies a bit of the science behind these everyday miracles.--Kraus, Daniel Copyright 2015 Booklist

From Booklist, Copyright © American Library Association. Used with permission.

School Library Journal PreS-Gr 2-Paul's poetic text highlights various forms water takes as it follows a brother and sister through the year. It includes autumn fog and rain, frozen ponds and falling snow, steam from cups of cocoa, and snowmelt turning dirt to mud. Chin once again demonstrates his mastery of nature illustration, infusing familiar outdoor scenes with simple kid-centric activities that will hold readers' attention while they listen to the text. Although not as dramatic as George Ella Lyon's All the Water in the World (S. & S., 2011), Paul's introduction to the water cycle includes more information that will help extend learning. She provides examples of the water content of various living things and stresses Earth's limited supply of fresh water. The author ties explanations of processes such as evaporation and condensation to pages of the text. VERDICT A first-rate introduction to the water cycle for young readers.-Kathy Piehl, Minnesota State University Library, Mankato (c) Copyright 2015. Library Journals LLC, a wholly owned subsidiary of Media Source, Inc. No redistribution permitted.

(c) Copyright Library Journals LLC, a wholly owned subsidiary of Media Source, Inc. No redistribution permitted.

Library Journal PreS-Gr 2-Paul's poetic text highlights various forms water takes as it follows a brother and sister through the year. It includes autumn fog and rain, frozen ponds and falling snow, steam from cups of cocoa, and snowmelt turning dirt to mud. Chin once again demonstrates his mastery of nature illustration, infusing familiar outdoor scenes with simple kid-centric activities that will hold readers' attention while they listen to the text. Although not as dramatic as George Ella Lyon's All the Water in the World (S. & S., 2011), Paul's introduction to the water cycle includes more information that will help extend learning. She provides examples of the water content of various living things and stresses Earth's limited supply of fresh water. The author ties explanations of processes such as evaporation and condensation to pages of the text. VERDICT A first-rate introduction to the water cycle for young readers.-Kathy Piehl, Minnesota State University Library, Mankato © Copyright 2015. Library Journals LLC, a wholly owned subsidiary of Media Source, Inc. No redistribution permitted.

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2016 (Younger Readers)
Who Done It?
Click to search this book in our catalog   Olivier Tallec

School Library Journal PreS-Gr 2-This long and slim French import is an absolute gem. Told mostly through illustration, it is a humorous seek-and-find book that will have kids opening the cleverly oriented horizontal-format pages again and again. Each spread sets up a question, beginning with "Who didn't get enough sleep?", and is followed by two rows of illustrations of people and animals set against plain white backdrops. Readers are asked to carefully observe each character's expression and demeanor to find the culprit. Funny questions like "Who couldn't hold it?" and "Who forgot a swimsuit?" will get kids giggling. The humor and detailed, expressive characters paired with the shape and feel of this book will delight a broad range of readers. VERDICT Great for storytime, lap reading, or independent readers, this is a must-have for most libraries serving children.-Jasmine L. Precopio, Fox Chapel Area School District, Pittsburgh, PA © Copyright 2015. Library Journals LLC, a wholly owned subsidiary of Media Source, Inc. No redistribution permitted.

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Publishers Weekly With a format that enhances its playful concept, this narrow, vertically oriented book offers lineups of impish animals, monsters, and children, along with reader-directed questions. Visual clues in the illustrations hint at the answers to questions include "Who is in love?" (a blushing boy holds a bouquet flowers behind his back), "Who couldn't hold it?" (a brown animal blushes for other reasons, standing in a puddle), and "Who is nervous?" (a blue rabbit trembles as a bee hovers overhead). The fun is in the deadpan expressions of the characters and, even when readers have successfully spotted the culprits, finding them again is unlikely to get old. There's plenty of opportunity for side conversations about what the other characters are up to, as well. Ages 3-5. (Oct.) © Copyright PWxyz, LLC. All rights reserved.

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2016 (Younger Readers)
Wolfie the Bunny
Click to search this book in our catalog   Ame Dyckman

Publishers Weekly Dyckman's (Tea Party Rules) rousing, warmhearted story opens as a family of city-dwelling bunnies discover a wolf cub in a basket on their front stoop. "He's going to eat us all up!" cries daughter Dot. But Papa proudly snaps pictures of Wolfie chowing down on carrots ("He's a good eater!"), and Mama's smitten, too. OHora's (Tyrannosaurus Wrecks!) distinctive folk-naïf spreads poke gentle fun at hipster families-Papa and Mama are decked out in cardigans and argyle, while Dot and Wolfie shop at a food coop selling such wares as locally-sourced organic bamboo. More laughs come from the irresistible contrast between Dot's sweet bunny countenance and her furious glares of rage. "I knew it!" she hisses when Wolfie bares his fangs while they're shopping. But he's not baring them at Dot-he's worried about the huge bear behind her. In a gratifying showdown, Dot overpowers the bear ("Let him go!" she yells. "Or... I'll eat you all up!") while Wolfie proves he's not only trustworthy but full of love. Ages 3-6. Author's agent: Scott Treimel, Scott Treimel N.Y. Illustrator's agent: Sean McCarthy, Sean McCarthy Literary Agency. (Feb.) © Copyright PWxyz, LLC. All rights reserved.

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Book list *Starred Review* When the Bunny family find an adorable baby wolf on their doorstep, Mama and Papa are thrilled. Voice-of-reason Dot says, He's going to eat us all up! And she keeps saying it as Wolfie gets bigger. And bigger! When he eats all the carrots, his parents send him (dressed in a large pink bunny suit) and Dot down to the store, and for a moment, it looks as if her prediction is about to come true at least where she is concerned. But it's not Dot Wolfie is staring at. It's Bear, who, as it turns out, is very hungry and ready to eat Wolfie, pink suit and all. Dot to the rescue! She gets the drop on Bear, who hightails it out of there. Then oh my goodness! Wolfie pounces on Dot. Was she right after all? Nope, it's only to give her a hug. This gets all the elements of the successful picture book just right: a familiar scenario (sibling rivalry), a scary adversary, a display of courage, and a happy ending. And then there's the art! OHora's unique acrylic illustrations have the look and feel of woodcuts. Big and bold, with strong yet simple shapes, the pictures are also intimate enough to capture Wolfie's goofy smile when he gets his pink bunny outfit, and the frightened but fierce expression on Dot's face. A crowd-pleaser for crowds big and small.--Cooper, Ilene Copyright 2015 Booklist

From Booklist, Copyright © American Library Association. Used with permission.

School Library Journal PreS-Gr 1-When the Bunny family finds a little bundle of joy-that happens to be a wolf-on their doorstep, they are smitten.Well, except for little Dot, who exclaims repeatedly, "He's going to eat us all up!!" Even her friends agree, but Dot's parents are captivated by the adorable baby-he's a good eater, sleeper, and drooler, they note. As Wolfie grows, Dot's worry is compounded with annoyance as he follows her everywhere in typical little brother-style. Having to go to the store for more carrots with Wolfie (who ate them all up!) makes Dot less than pleased, and she is on guard lest he tries to eat her. The fact that Wolfie is wearing an endearing bunny outfit does not make her feel better, but it does make the bear at the market think that Wolfie would make a yummy meal. Rather than run for safety, Dot terrifies the bear with tough talk of eating him up and saves Wolfie, who thanks her by pouncing on her with a big hug. The now-bonded siblings walk home hand in hand. The text is seamlessly integrated with the illustrations and uses various fonts to good effect. OHora's acrylic paintings are the heart of this tale. They clearly show everyone's feelings from fear to sadness to joy to anger to love and everything in between, and there are brilliant bits of humor and whimsy added to the mix. VERDICT A great book for one-on-one sharing that's also sure to be a storytime hit.-Catherine Callegari, Gay-Kimball Library, Troy, NH (c) Copyright 2015. Library Journals LLC, a wholly owned subsidiary of Media Source, Inc. No redistribution permitted.

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2016 (Younger Readers)
The Wonderful Fluffy Little Squishy
Click to search this book in our catalog   Beatrice Alemagna
 
2016 (Younger Readers)
Woodpecker Wham!
Click to search this book in our catalog   April Pulley Sayre

Book list Woodpeckers don't just peck. They chop, bonk, tap, and slam, doing serious work. The same team that collaborated most recently on Eat like a Bear (2014) now takes youngsters through the seasons with a creature they may observe in their own backyards. Short, playful text featuring plenty of action words and onomatopoeia describes a variety of woodpecker activities, from sending messages, finding insects and sap, and preening to preparing homes. Their role in the ecosystem is also indicated. After woodpeckers abandon their homes, other animals may move in. And woodpeckers help with seed dispersal when they make a meal of berries. Endnotes offer further information, beginning with the explanation that the varieties featured in the book are those that live together in the eastern deciduous forests of the U.S. Paper-collage art depicts the different kinds of woodpeckers in all their beauty. No cartoony black, white, and red here: these birds sport patterns of bars, spots, or streaks, and coloring may include browns and yellows (a key is provided). This strikes the right note for budding bird-watchers.--McDermott, Jeanne Copyright 2015 Booklist

From Booklist, Copyright © American Library Association. Used with permission.

School Library Journal PreS-Gr 3-A northern flicker, a yellow-bellied sapsucker, and other woodpeckers of the eastern deciduous forests "chip," "chop," and "wham" their way through the seasons through crisp verses and paper collages in this informational picture book. There are quiet moments as well: woodpeckers "pluck and feed" at the cherry tree while cherries dangle against an azure sky. Jenkins's illustrations are top-notch, beautifully depicting the different subspecies of woodpeckers, such as the flicker's subtle grays and golds, which contrast with its neck rings, and spotted chest. With metronomic precision, Sayre's verses describe the woodpecker's activity: "Hawk's a-hunting./Stop. Drop. Hide./Quiet/on the other side," and along with the illustrations, mostly spreads, make for engaging read-alouds. The end pages, supported by information from Cornell's Laboratory of Ornithology and other biologists, offer more information that will be key for students engaged in Common Core activities, paired with small images, which name the featured woodpeckers. Readers learn how these birds forage, build shelter and nests, avoid predators, and instruct their young, among other topics. VERDICT Lovely and exciting, this title is a great hook for young researchers, as well as fledgling ornithologists.-Teresa Pfeifer, The Springfield Renaissance School, Springfield, MA (c) Copyright 2015. Library Journals LLC, a wholly owned subsidiary of Media Source, Inc. No redistribution permitted.

(c) Copyright Library Journals LLC, a wholly owned subsidiary of Media Source, Inc. No redistribution permitted.

Library Journal PreS-Gr 3-A northern flicker, a yellow-bellied sapsucker, and other woodpeckers of the eastern deciduous forests "chip," "chop," and "wham" their way through the seasons through crisp verses and paper collages in this informational picture book. There are quiet moments as well: woodpeckers "pluck and feed" at the cherry tree while cherries dangle against an azure sky. Jenkins's illustrations are top-notch, beautifully depicting the different subspecies of woodpeckers, such as the flicker's subtle grays and golds, which contrast with its neck rings, and spotted chest. With metronomic precision, Sayre's verses describe the woodpecker's activity: "Hawk's a-hunting./Stop. Drop. Hide./Quiet/on the other side," and along with the illustrations, mostly spreads, make for engaging read-alouds. The end pages, supported by information from Cornell's Laboratory of Ornithology and other biologists, offer more information that will be key for students engaged in Common Core activities, paired with small images, which name the featured woodpeckers. Readers learn how these birds forage, build shelter and nests, avoid predators, and instruct their young, among other topics. VERDICT Lovely and exciting, this title is a great hook for young researchers, as well as fledgling ornithologists.-Teresa Pfeifer, The Springfield Renaissance School, Springfield, MA © Copyright 2015. Library Journals LLC, a wholly owned subsidiary of Media Source, Inc. No redistribution permitted.

(c) Copyright Library Journals LLC, a wholly owned subsidiary of Media Source, Inc. No redistribution permitted.

Publishers Weekly Using a brisk, upbeat cadence, the team behind Eat Like a Bear and Vulture View chronicles the lives of several species of woodpecker as they communicate, collect food, chisel bark, and more. "Fan those feathers./ Shower clean./ Sunbathe dry./ Then oil and preen!" writes Sayre as two yellow birds spread their wings under blue skies of rain and sun. Jenkins's torn-paper collages combine downy textures and boldly contrasting patterns, creating an almost three-dimensional effect. Northern flickers have plumage suggestive of leopard print, while other specimens are mottled in black and white. Stylish feathers aside, Sayre concludes with a woodpecker doing what woodpeckers do best: "Bill to bark. Build!/ Slam, slam, slam!/ Chip and chop./ Woodpecker wham!" Substantial appendices provide a wealth of woodpecker information for birders in training. Ages 4-8. (May) © Copyright PWxyz, LLC. All rights reserved.

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2016 (Younger Readers)
Written and Drawn by Henrietta:
Click to search this book in our catalog   Liniers

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