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ALA Notable Books for Children
2016 (Younger Readers)
An Ambush of Tigers: A Wild Gathering of Collective Nouns
Click to search this book in our catalog   Betsy R. Rosenthal
2016 (Younger Readers)
The Book Itch: Freedom, Truth, and Harlems Greatest Bookstore
Click to search this book in our catalog   Vaunda Micheaux Nelson
2016 (Younger Readers)
Ballet Cat The Totally Secret Secret
Click to search this book in our catalog   Bob Shea
 
2016 (Younger Readers)
Beep! Beep! Go to Sleep!
Click to search this book in our catalog   Todd Tarpley
2016 (Younger Readers)
Boats for Papa
Click to search this book in our catalog   Jessixa Bagley
2016 (Younger Readers)
A Chicken Followed Me Home!: Questions and Answers about a Familiar Fowl
Click to search this book in our catalog   Robin Page

School Library Journal PreS-Gr 2-With a touch of humor, this well-designed title presents everything you always wanted to know about chickens-but didn't know to ask. The book starts with an unnamed narrator who's been followed home by a fowl, asking, "What do I do now?" After the hen eventually lays and hatches eggs and the chicks mature into adult hens, the child hopes that the creatures will "follow someone else home." Along the way, readers are introduced to information on anatomy, care, and life cycle. A question begins each topic ("Will my chicken lay eggs?") with keywords highlighted with larger, bolder type. Details are labeled or given small call-out illustrations. Digitally produced, the images are well integrated with the text and use highly textured shapes. Bright, solid color backgrounds alternate with white ones. Readers will find tons of fun and well-presented material; one page displays 260 eggs, the average number a hen lays in a year. A concluding spread of "More Chicken Questions" gives further detail and a list of more resources. VERDICT A charming addition to animal collections. Expect newly hatched domestic fowl enthusiasts to crow over this one.-Carol S. Surges, formerly at Longfellow Middle School, Wauwatosa, WI (c) Copyright 2015. Library Journals LLC, a wholly owned subsidiary of Media Source, Inc. No redistribution permitted.

(c) Copyright Library Journals LLC, a wholly owned subsidiary of Media Source, Inc. No redistribution permitted.

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2016 (Younger Readers)
Detective Gordon: The First Case
Click to search this book in our catalog   Ulf Nilsson

School Library Journal Gr 1-4-Detective Gordon is a portly toad who would much rather eat cake and drink tea than solve crimes. Alas, being the only policeman in the forest, he agrees to investigate the bothersome case of a squirrel's disappearing stockpile of nuts. While keeping watch over the crime scene, our hapless detective discovers a baby mouse in the act of stealing. Gordon soon realizes that she is not the actual thief but just very hungry. He takes her back to the police station and in short order, bestows upon her the name Buffy and deputizes her. Now working as a team, the two go on to solve the case and catch the crafty criminals. Translated from the original Swedish text, Nilsson offers one of those unique books that deliver age-appropriate content for young but advanced readers. This would also be a good choice for a read aloud in the classroom. The full-color illustrations add whimsy to the tale and perfectly complement this gentle read. VERDICT Hand this one to precocious readers who have graduated from early chapter books but aren't ready for too much strife in their novels.-Amy Nolan, St. Joseph Public Library, St. Joseph, MI (c) Copyright 2015. Library Journals LLC, a wholly owned subsidiary of Media Source, Inc. No redistribution permitted.

(c) Copyright Library Journals LLC, a wholly owned subsidiary of Media Source, Inc. No redistribution permitted.

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2016 (Younger Readers)
Dont Throw It to Mo!
Click to search this book in our catalog   David A. Adler
2016 (Younger Readers)
Drum Dream Girl: How One Girls Courage Changed Music
Click to search this book in our catalog   Margarita Engle

Publishers Weekly A riot of tropical color adds sabor to the tale of Millo Castro Zaldarriaga, a Chinese-African-Cuban girl who dreams "of pounding tall conga drums,/ tapping small bongó drums/ and boom boom booming/ with long, loud sticks/ on big, round, silvery/ moon-bright timbales." Everybody in Cuba believes that only boys should play the drums, and her own father forbids her to perform, but the "drum dream girl" (as she's referred to throughout) finds her own drums, practices, and persists until her father relents and hires a teacher. Lopez's (Tito Puente, Mambo King) paintings fuse dream and reality as the girl flies through the air, drumming on the moon and making music with butterflies and birds; Engle's (Silver People) lines dance with percussive sound words and rhythmic repetition. Though an afterword reveals that Zaldarriaga later became famous enough to perform for Franklin and Eleanor Roosevelt, Engle focuses on her initial struggles rather than her subsequent career. A valuable addition to the growing library of stories about strong Latina women. Ages 4-8. Author's agent: Michelle Humphrey, Martha Kaplan Agency. Illustrator's agent: Stefanie von Borstel, Full Circle Literary. (Mar.) © Copyright PWxyz, LLC. All rights reserved.

(c) Copyright PWxyz, LLC. All rights reserved

Book list A talented young girl with a passion for drumming dreams of playing music in this upbeat story based on the life of Cuban musician Millo Castro Zaldarriaga. Told repeatedly that girls cannot be drummers, she refuses to give up, practicing in secret and delighting in every bit of music around her. A visit to an open-minded music teacher results in lessons and, eventually, the opportunity to perform in public. Vibrant, warm, and hopeful, this expressive story shows the power of perseverance and importance of following your dreams. Engle's prose flows easily, with clean but evocative language that will be accessible to a range of young readers. López's illustrations are lushly saturated with color, and the warm palette and bright tones transport readers to the tropical setting, while visible brushstrokes and layered colors bring depth to each scene. The text and illustrations work together beautifully here, creating a story that will imbue readers with inspiration and a yearning to make music of their own. An author's note provides some background on Zaldarriaga, the inspiration for this fictional story.--Hayes, Summer Copyright 2015 Booklist

From Booklist, Copyright © American Library Association. Used with permission.

School Library Journal Gr 1-4-Engle's spare, rhythmic text gets at the heart of the struggle to achieve a dream in this picture-book biography about a Chinese African Cuban girl who aspired to play drums even when society's double standards stood as a barrier. Growing up in tempestuous 1930s Havana, during a time when universities were often shut down because of their opposition to the dictatorial President Machado, Millo Castro Zaldarriaga dared to dream of playing percussion instruments-timbales, congas, bongós-but her father was adamant that "only boys should play drums." But still she persisted in her hopes and eventually, with the help of her sisters and music teacher, became a member of the renowned Anacaona, Cuba's first all-girl dance band, founded by her sister, Cuchito Castro. López's zinging, neon-tinged art highlights the island's diversity, depicting the drum girl's flights of fancy set against the backdrop of carnival scenes and outdoor cafes. Details of Cuba's and the protagonist's Chinese, African, Taíno, and Spanish roots are seamlessly interwoven into the lyrical narrative and luminous acrylic paintings. The alliterative text parallels the snappy syncopation of the subject's instruments. The heroine's tenacity in the face of naysayers will inspire all dreamers, and the illustrator's smile-inducing cameo on the last page emphasizes the universality of Millo's story. For those looking for more nonfiction titles about female musical powerhouses, such as Monica Brown's My Name Is Celia/Me llamo Celia (Cooper Square, 2004), Katheryn Russell-Brown's Little Melba and Her Big Trombone (Lee & Low, 2014), and Carole Boston Weatherford's Leontyne Price: Voice of a Century (Knopf, 2014). An author's note gives more background on the groundbreaking percussionist. -Shelley Diaz, School Library Journal (c) Copyright 2015. Library Journals LLC, a wholly owned subsidiary of Media Source, Inc. No redistribution permitted.

(c) Copyright Library Journals LLC, a wholly owned subsidiary of Media Source, Inc. No redistribution permitted.

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2016 (Younger Readers)
Emmanuels Dream: The True Story of Emmanuel Ofosu Yeboah
Click to search this book in our catalog   Laurie Ann Thompson
2016 (Younger Readers)
Finding Winnie: The True Story of the Worlds Most Famous Bear
Click to search this book in our catalog   Lindsay Mattick and Sophie Blackall
2016 (Younger Readers)
Float
Click to search this book in our catalog   Daniel Miyares
 
2016 (Younger Readers)
Flop to the Top!
Click to search this book in our catalog   Eleanor Davis
2016 (Younger Readers)
Flutter and Hum / Aleteo y Zumbido: Animal Poems
Click to search this book in our catalog   Julie Paschkis
2016 (Younger Readers)
Gingerbread for Liberty!: How a German Baker Helped Win the American Revolution
Click to search this book in our catalog   Mara Rockliff
 
2016 (Younger Readers)
Grandma Lives in a Perfume Village
Click to search this book in our catalog   Fang Suzhen

Publishers Weekly Taiwanese author Suzhen writes honestly, even starkly, about the death of a grandparent and the suffering that precedes it. Xiao Le (he's very young, with baby cheeks and a beloved toy truck) hasn't visited Grandma in some time, and he's initially frightened to see her. Little by little, Xiao Le's fear turns to sympathy: "My truck will sleep with you, Grandma," he says. This is the last time he and his mother will see Grandma. Soon after, his mother tells him, "Grandma has left Perfume Village and moved into heaven." Suzhen conveys with tenderness the way Xiao Le understands his mother's grief and thinks of ways to comfort her: "Look, Mom, Grandma has turned on the light!" he says when the moon comes out. A wooden translation hobbles the story ("It had been a long time since he saw her"), but Danowski's (The Forever Flowers) exquisitely executed artwork redeems it, especially her intimate portraits of mother and son. While the book's audience is likely to be small, readers who discover it will find that Danowski's work eases its difficult moments. Ages 4-8. (May) © Copyright PWxyz, LLC. All rights reserved.

(c) Copyright PWxyz, LLC. All rights reserved

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2016 (Younger Readers)
The Grasshopper & the Ants
Click to search this book in our catalog   Jerry Pinkney
2016 (Younger Readers)
Growing Up Pedro
Click to search this book in our catalog   Matt Tavares
 
2016 (Younger Readers)
Hippos Are Huge!
Click to search this book in our catalog   Jonathan London
2016 (Younger Readers)
I Yam a Donkey!
Click to search this book in our catalog   Cece Bell

Publishers Weekly Newbery Honoree Bell (El Deafo) creates a laugh-out-loud dialogue in the tradition of "Who's on First?" or Lane Smith's It's a Book. "I yam a donkey!" a googly-eyed donkey proclaims. A bespectacled yam objects. "What did you say? `I yam a donkey?' The proper way to say that is `I am a donkey.' " "You is a donkey, too?" the donkey asks. "You is a funny-looking donkey." The yam tries to educate the donkey, while the donkey demonstrates only hopeless thickheadedness. The appearance of a carrot, a turnip, and some green beans allows the yam to review conjugations of the verb "to be." The donkey, however, spies a meal. "Oh!" he cries, finally getting it. "You is lunch!" In a linguistic landscape where literally can mean figuratively and flammable and inflammable are interchangeable, Bell's story celebrates the idea that language changes, and pedants who can't adapt will be left in the dust (or in a donkey's belly). The ending sends a message that any child can endorse: "If you is going to be eaten, good grammar don't matter." Ages 4-8. Agent: Caryn Wiseman, Andrea Brown Literary Agency. (June) © Copyright PWxyz, LLC. All rights reserved.

(c) Copyright PWxyz, LLC. All rights reserved

School Library Journal Gr 1-3-The cartoon illustrations of Bell's stab at eliminating a grammatical error are more engaging than her text, and it is probable that the intended audience will not grasp the lesson she's put forward. A donkey states, "I yam a donkey!" and a yam protests the improper use of the word yam. In the ensuing conversation, the donkey repeatedly uses yam when he should be saying am and the tuber becomes increasingly perturbed. Bell's drawings, done in china marker and acrylic, are lively and convey emotion through her judicious use of line, but the grammatical issue is less common now than in Popeye's heyday, and the joke goes on so long that it becomes tiresome. VERDICT Despite its inviting illustrations, this book misses the mark.-Miriam Lang Budin, Chappaqua Library, NY © Copyright 2015. Library Journals LLC, a wholly owned subsidiary of Media Source, Inc. No redistribution permitted.

(c) Copyright Library Journals LLC, a wholly owned subsidiary of Media Source, Inc. No redistribution permitted.

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2016 (Younger Readers)
If You Plant a Seed
Click to search this book in our catalog   Kadir Nelson
 
2016 (Younger Readers)
Last Stop on Market Street
Click to search this book in our catalog   Matt De La Pena
2016 (Younger Readers)
Lenny & Lucy
Click to search this book in our catalog   Philip C. Stead
2016 (Younger Readers)
Leo: A Ghost Story
Click to search this book in our catalog   Mac Barnett
 
2016 (Younger Readers)
Lillians Right to Vote: A Celebration of the Voting Rights Act of 1965
Click to search this book in our catalog   Jonah Winter
2016 (Younger Readers)
Mango, Abuela, and Me
Click to search this book in our catalog   Meg Medina
2016 (Younger Readers)
The Moon is Going to Addys House
Click to search this book in our catalog   Ida Pearle
 
2016 (Younger Readers)
The Most Amazing Creature in the Sea
Click to search this book in our catalog   Brenda Z. Guiberson
2016 (Younger Readers)
Moving Blocks
Click to search this book in our catalog   Yusuke Yonezu
2016 (Younger Readers)
Mr Squirrel and the Moon
Click to search this book in our catalog   Sebastian Meschenmoser

Publishers Weekly Meschenmoser's story opens as a wheel of yellow cheese rolls off its wagon, hurtles off a cliff, and lands on a branch outside a squirrel's home. In the same sort of misidentification that drove Meschenmoser's Waiting for Winter, Mr. Squirrel concludes that the yellow cheese is the moon, and worries that he'll be fingered as its thief: "He'd be arrested and thrown in prison." A silent spread pictures the squirrel's fears with mordant humor as he appears in a small prison uniform, reflecting remorsefully as his human cellmate works on a piece of embroidery. (Further inspection reveals a miniature squirrel-sized latrine along the back wall.) The action heats up as a hedgehog, billy goat, and crew of mice join the fray (further crowding the imaginary prison cell of the conscience-stricken squirrel) until they can work out how to put the cheese back where it belongs. Meschenmoser's soft pencil portraits of the squirrel's inner fears teeter right at the sweet spot between anguish and humor. The story's deepest pleasure comes from the contrast between its ever-more-ridiculous scenarios and the artist's solemn, classically proportioned drafting style. Ages 4-8. (Jan.) © Copyright PWxyz, LLC. All rights reserved.

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2016 (Younger Readers)
My Tatas Remedies / Los remedios de mi Tata
Click to search this book in our catalog   Roni Capin Rivera-Ashford
2016 (Younger Readers)
A Pig, a Fox, and a Box
Click to search this book in our catalog   Jonathan Fenske
2016 (Younger Readers)
Piper Green and the Fairy Tree: Too Much Good Luck
Click to search this book in our catalog   Ellen Potter
 
2016 (Younger Readers)
The Popcorn Astronauts: And Other Biteable Rhymes
Click to search this book in our catalog   Deborah Ruddell
2016 (Younger Readers)
The Princess and the Pony
Click to search this book in our catalog   Kate Beaton
2016 (Younger Readers)
Raindrops Roll
Click to search this book in our catalog   April Pulley Sayre
 
2016 (Younger Readers)
Red
Click to search this book in our catalog   Jan De Kinder
2016 (Younger Readers)
Roger is Reading a Book
Click to search this book in our catalog   Koen Van Biesen
2016 (Younger Readers)
Sidewalk Flowers
Click to search this book in our catalog   JonArno Lawson
 
2016 (Younger Readers)
The Skunk
Click to search this book in our catalog   JMac Barnett
2016 (Younger Readers)
Special Delivery
Click to search this book in our catalog   Philip C. Stead
2016 (Younger Readers)
Supertruck
Click to search this book in our catalog   Stephen Savage
 
2016 (Younger Readers)
Swan: The Life and Dance of Anna Pavlova
Click to search this book in our catalog   Laurel Snyder
2016 (Younger Readers)
Tiptoe Tapirs
Click to search this book in our catalog   Hanmin Kim
2016 (Younger Readers)
Trombone Shorty
Click to search this book in our catalog   Troy Andrews
 
2016 (Younger Readers)
Two Mice
Click to search this book in our catalog   Sergio Ruzzier
2016 (Younger Readers)
Wait
Click to search this book in our catalog   Antoinette Portis
2016 (Younger Readers)
Water Is Water: A Book About the Water Cycle
Click to search this book in our catalog   Miranda Paul
 
2016 (Younger Readers)
Who Done It?
Click to search this book in our catalog   Olivier Tallec
2016 (Younger Readers)
Wolfie the Bunny
Click to search this book in our catalog   Ame Dyckman

Publishers Weekly Dyckman's (Tea Party Rules) rousing, warmhearted story opens as a family of city-dwelling bunnies discover a wolf cub in a basket on their front stoop. "He's going to eat us all up!" cries daughter Dot. But Papa proudly snaps pictures of Wolfie chowing down on carrots ("He's a good eater!"), and Mama's smitten, too. OHora's (Tyrannosaurus Wrecks!) distinctive folk-naïf spreads poke gentle fun at hipster families-Papa and Mama are decked out in cardigans and argyle, while Dot and Wolfie shop at a food coop selling such wares as locally-sourced organic bamboo. More laughs come from the irresistible contrast between Dot's sweet bunny countenance and her furious glares of rage. "I knew it!" she hisses when Wolfie bares his fangs while they're shopping. But he's not baring them at Dot-he's worried about the huge bear behind her. In a gratifying showdown, Dot overpowers the bear ("Let him go!" she yells. "Or... I'll eat you all up!") while Wolfie proves he's not only trustworthy but full of love. Ages 3-6. Author's agent: Scott Treimel, Scott Treimel N.Y. Illustrator's agent: Sean McCarthy, Sean McCarthy Literary Agency. (Feb.) © Copyright PWxyz, LLC. All rights reserved.

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2016 (Younger Readers)
The Wonderful Fluffy Little Squishy
Click to search this book in our catalog   Beatrice Alemagna
 
2016 (Younger Readers)
Woodpecker Wham!
Click to search this book in our catalog   April Pulley Sayre
2016 (Younger Readers)
Written and Drawn by Henrietta:
Click to search this book in our catalog   Liniers

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