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New Upper School Titles
2013
The Firebird
Click to search this book in our catalog   Susanna Kearsley
2013
The Other Child
Click to search this book in our catalog   Charlotte Link
Book list From Booklist, Copyright American Library Association. Used with permission. 9781605984308 *Starred Review* Most readers would never guess that this gripping psychological thriller, set in a small English village, is the work of a best-selling German novelist. Link's English-language debut is a dark, disturbing novel of suspense on par with those of Minette Walters. Wallflower Gwen Beckett's engagement party should have been as quiet as the bride-to-be. But her father's old friend Fiona Barnes can't hold her tongue and accuses Gwen's fiancee of using Gwen to escape his own lackluster life and inherit the Becketts' land. Later that night, Fiona is murdered. The crime bears similarities to the recent murder of a young college student. Could the two women have anything in common? Or could the murder be related to e-mails Fiona had recently written to Gwen's father, breaking the silence about what happened between them during the war? The passages describing Gwen's time at the Becketts' farm during the Blitz introduce us to the other child referenced in the title a damaged orphan who attaches himself to Fiona on the train ride to Yorkshire and accompanies her to the Becketts. Link builds a sense of menace in these chapters that makes readers dread turning the page but keeps them up all night doing just that.--Keefe, Karen Copyright 2010 Booklist
Library Journal (c) Copyright 2010. Library Journals LLC, a wholly owned subsidiary of Media Source, Inc. No redistribution permitted. 9781605984308 After reading only a few pages of Link's U.S debut, a best seller in Germany, it is easy to see why she is the most successful female crime author in her home country. When two murders occur in the small English village of Scarborough, the second one a copycat killing that takes place months after the first, Det. Valerie Almond is at a loss. Then she learns that the murders may be connected to the evacuation of children from the area during World War II. Fiona Barnes was a young teen during that time and writes letters to a close friend detailing the tragic story of "the other child." Exactly who is the "other child" and what does this child from the past have to do with the present-day murders? VERDICT This phenomenal, multilayered mystery offers plenty of psychological intrigue and suspense. Skillfully juggling the two stories, Link sets a fast pace and weaves in characters who are both tragic and ones readers can relate to. Fans of psychological thrillers and dark mysteries will love this engrossing novel.-Amy M. Davis, Parmley Billings Lib., MT (c) Copyright 2013. Library Journals LLC, a wholly owned subsidiary of Media Source, Inc. No redistribution permitted.
Publishers Weekly (c) Copyright PWxyz, LLC. All rights reserved 9781605984308 Link, a bestseller in her native Germany, makes her U.S. debut with a sophisticated and thoughtful mystery set in England. After an ominous prologue, in which a woman stumbles across an unnamed secret on a remote farm in Yorkshire in 1970, the action shifts to 2008 in the same area. College student Amy Mills leaves a babysitting gig late at night to travel home, only to find her regular, relatively safe route blocked off, which proves to be a prelude to her brutal killing. Both incidents recede into the background as Link presents a large cast of characters drawn together by the engagement of Gwen Beckett, a wallflower whose fiance is viewed as only being after the farm she's due to inherit. More death follows, with the motive possibly linked to Gwen's father's disturbing past and the tragic fallout from the evacuation of children from London during the Blitz. Fans of Ruth Rendell and Minette Walters will be enthralled. (Apr.) (c) Copyright PWxyz, LLC. All rights reserved.
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2013
Leap of Faith
Click to search this book in our catalog   Jamie Blair
 
2013
Food, Inc
Click to search this book in our catalog   Peter Pringle
Library Journal (c) Copyright 2010. Library Journals LLC, a wholly owned subsidiary of Media Source, Inc. No redistribution permitted. 9780743226110 When it comes to genetic engineering, says the author of Those Are Real Bullets, both agribusiness and ecowarriors have got it all wrong. (c) Copyright 2010. Library Journals LLC, a wholly owned subsidiary of Media Source, Inc. No redistribution permitted.
Library Journal (c) Copyright 2010. Library Journals LLC, a wholly owned subsidiary of Media Source, Inc. No redistribution permitted. 9780743226110 Journalist Pringle (Those Are Real Bullets) believes that there is nothing inherently unsafe about genetically modified (GM) foods and that technology has the potential to relieve hunger and pain for millions of people. However, in this discussion of the aspects of GM foods, he does not hesitate to point out the perils. Aside from potential crop and environmental contamination from lab-altered genes, especially troubling to the author is the degree to which plant biotechnology gives control to a few international conglomerates that own patents to the products and processes. Similar in coverage and style to Daniel Charles's Lords of the Harvest and Bill Lambrecht's Dinner at the New Gene Cafe, Pringle's work also relates very recent developments such as biopharming (growing pharmaceuticals in corn crops) and how several starving African countries refused donations of U.S. corn because it contained genetically modified seeds. This book is intended for a general audience and, as such, is well suited for public libraries and for undergraduate collections in academic libraries.-William H. Wiese, Iowa State Univ. Lib., Ames (c) Copyright 2010. Library Journals LLC, a wholly owned subsidiary of Media Source, Inc. No redistribution permitted.
School Library Journal (c) Copyright 2010. Library Journals LLC, a wholly owned subsidiary of Media Source, Inc. No redistribution permitted. 9780743226110 Adult/High School-Biotechnology inspires hope in some and horror in others. A complex topic, it invokes many contemporary concerns-third world famine, biodiversity, corporate responsibility, the ethics of corporate ownership of the processes of life itself-and involves a bewildering array of interrelated national and international legal, political, scientific, and economic forces. Public discourse is polarized with scaremongering on one side and arrogance on the other, and it is difficult for the nonspecialist to arrive at an informed opinion. Here, in readable, journalistic fashion, Pringle provides what has been missing: facts and explanations, reasoned argument, and common ground. He reveals many dimensions of several controversies that will be familiar to most readers from media coverage, yet remain poorly understood: Is the monarch butterfly endangered by pesticide-laced corn? Are we throwing away our heritage of biodiversity? Are plant hunters cultural pirates? As the title indicates, Pringle points out the danger of a few large and poorly regulated corporations owning and controlling so much of the world's agriculture and genetic technology, but he doesn't demonize. Rather than simplifying a complicated subject, he accomplishes the more difficult task of presenting the complexities of genetic science, academic politics, corporate strategies, or international treaties in such a clear and interesting manner that readers come to appreciate and understand them. This is a book to satisfy curiosity and engender concern, and any of its chapters would provide an excellent subject for discussion groups.-Christine C. Menefee, Fairfax County Public Library, VA (c) Copyright 2010. Library Journals LLC, a wholly owned subsidiary of Media Source, Inc. No redistribution permitted.
Choice Copyright American Library Association, used with permission. 9780743226110 Pringle looks at the global war over genetically modified foods, pitting a handful of corporate, "life science" giants against a worldwide network of anticorporate individuals. He takes a middle-of-the-road approach and indicates that benefits of biotech agriculture to food are too valuable to be left to either side of this conflict. Corporations leading the genetically modified side indicate that these products offer a new survival against frost, drought, pest, and plague. Some governments have refused to approve planting of new genetically modified crops, pending further investigation. The ultimate vote of "no confidence" came in 1992 when African nations facing starvation turned away US food aid because it contained genetically modified corn. The book is extremely well written and interesting reading; neither of the combatants are going to be totally satisfied since a middle-of-the-road approach is what Pringle tries to maintain, telling both sides of the story. Notes; acknowledgments; adequate index. For all major libraries so that consumers can become knowledgeable in this battle that will be so important to them. ^BSumming Up: Essential. All levels. H. W. Ockerman Ohio State University
Publishers Weekly (c) Copyright PWxyz, LLC. All rights reserved 9780743226110 Imagine a world where yellow beans are patented, aromatic basmati rice has lost its fragrance because of genetic tinkering and Canadian farmers are sued by multinational behemoths because pollen from GM (genetically modified) crops somehow got into their fields and fertilized their plants. You don't have to imagine it: this, says Pringle, is the world we live in today. A widely published journalist, Pringle (Those Are Real Bullets) paints a troubling picture of the world's food supply. Multinational corporations are able to patent genes from crops that have been cultivated by farmers for centuries; governments of starving African nations refuse GM food they fear is poisonous; scientists hastily publish research that is blown out of proportion by the news media; and "green" activists vandalize greenhouses and fields where scientists are conducting GM research. Pringle roundly castigates all sides. Scientists, he says, have been remarkably inventive in their endeavors to improve the food we eat, using a gene from daffodils, for example, in growing golden rice with high levels of vitamin A that can help prevent blindness in the undernourished. But large corporations, he asserts, have squandered the public's good will toward GM products as they rushed so-called "Frankenfoods" into stores without adequate testing or disclosure of what makes it different. Pringle gives some glimmer of hope for the future through time-honored methods of cross-pollination, but his main story is of an industry with great potential for feeding starving millions and reducing our reliance on chemical pesticides, but that has instead created a global mess. Agent, Amanda Urban. (June 10) (c) Copyright PWxyz, LLC. All rights reserved
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2013
I am Malala
Click to search this book in our catalog   Malala Yousafzai
2013
Things That Matter
Click to search this book in our catalog   Charles Krauthammer
 

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