Talking to Get Every Child Ready to Read - Books That Invite Participation
1992
Brown bear, brown bear, what do you see?
Book Jacket   by Bill Martin, Jr. ; pictures by Eric Carle.
Book list From Booklist, Copyright American Library Association. Used with permission. 9780805017441 Ages 2-6. First available in 1967 from Holt, Rinehart and Winston's school division, this was again published in 1983 as a trade book [BKL D 1 83]. Brown Bear's popularity has snowballed ever since, as preschool and primary grade teachers spread the word: first, that it's a terrific book for teaching colors and also that, with the whole-language movement taking off, it's a high-interest, beginning reader with rhythm, repetition, and predictability. The new edition offers the original wording, with such minor changes from the 1983 edition as "redbird" to "red bird" and "I see a mother looking at me" to "I see a teacher looking at me." The new illustrations feature crisper lines, bolder colors, and a bit more texture than the originals, making them even more striking. ~--Carolyn Phelan
School Library Journal (c) Copyright 2010. Library Journals LLC, a wholly owned subsidiary of Media Source, Inc. No redistribution permitted. 9780805017441 PreS-Gr 1-- In this new edition of the popular classic (Holt, 1983), the same clean design and crisp text remain. Illustrations, however, have been slightly altered. Stronger colors and more texture help delineate animal bodies more sharply. Positions and shapes are slightly changed, resulting in a less static look. Red Bird is shown in flying position with a sleeker body, sharper beak, and more carefully defined tail and wing features. Yellow Duck has webbed feet and an open bill; Blue Horse has black hooves and teeth showing; Green Frog a spotted back and pink tongue; the former Mother with pale pink skin has become Teacher with beige skin tones and darker hair. The overall effect is livelier and more interesting, although changes are minimal enough that the old edition is still serviceable. When replacements are in order, this will be a welcome addition. --Sally R. Dow, Ossining Public Library, NY (c) Copyright 2010. Library Journals LLC, a wholly owned subsidiary of Media Source, Inc. No redistribution permitted.
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2000
Good night, Gorilla
Book Jacket   Peggy Rathmann.
Publishers Weekly (c) Copyright PWxyz, LLC. All rights reserved 9780698116498 "Universally understandable subject matter and a narrative conveyed almost entirely through pictures mark this as an ideal title for beginners," said PW. Ages 2-6. (May) (c) Copyright PWxyz, LLC. All rights reserved
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1997
Is your mama a llama?
Book Jacket   written by Deborah Guarino ; pictures by Steven Kellogg.
 
1986
Jesse Bear, what will you wear?
 by Nancy White Carlstrom ; illustrations by Bruce Degen.
School Library Journal (c) Copyright 2010. Library Journals LLC, a wholly owned subsidiary of Media Source, Inc. No redistribution permitted. 9780027173505 PreS-Gr 2 ``Jesse Bear, what will you wear? /What will you wear in the morning?'' wonders Jesse's mama. Throughout his day, Jesse proudly wears not only clothes (``my pants that dance in the morning''), but the sun, his highchair (and, inevitably, his ``juice from a pear /and rice in my hair'') and the bubbles in his bathtub too. The rhymes, besides having a charming lilt to them, are clean and catchy and beg to be recited. The illustrations, watercolors with pen and ink, combine freshness of color with freshness of attitude, and the result is a cheery, uncluttered exuberance. Words and illustrations interplay beautifully, each enhancing the other's brightness. The youngest members of the audience will love following the day's progression from morning to noon to night and recognizing familiar activities from each time of day; all of this is laid out simply and with great appeal. The double-page spread of Jesse's father's return home from work actually beams, seeming larger than the size of the pages. There's much for a child to recognize in this book: not just physical objects but attitudes, habits and relationships, too. Jesse Bear celebrates, and does more than justice to, youngsters' joy, pride and comfort in their own independence as they try on their own familiar environment and find that it fits. Liza Bliss, Central New England College, Worcester, Mass. (c) Copyright 2010. Library Journals LLC, a wholly owned subsidiary of Media Source, Inc. No redistribution permitted.
Publishers Weekly (c) Copyright PWxyz, LLC. All rights reserved 9780027173505 Readers who enjoyed Degen's book Jamberry will most likely appreciate this one too, written by first-time author Carlstrom. It's illustrated with the same bright colors and sweet style that characterized Jamberry, and is written in similar breezy rhymes. The book follows a young bear through a day as he playfully ``wears'' not only his shirt and pants, but also the sun on his legs, sand on his arm, his mealtime chair, his bathwater and bubbles, and finally, ``Sleep in my eyes/And stars in the skies/Moon on my bed/And dreams in my head/That's what I'll wear tonight.'' Ingenuous yet never coy, this is an appealing book to share with a young child. (25) (c) Copyright PWxyz, LLC. All rights reserved
Book list From Booklist, Copyright American Library Association. Used with permission. 9780027173505 Ages 2-4. An exuberant, beguiling rhyme about a bear child's activities throughout the day. (Ap 1 86)
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  Book Jacket
1995
Jump, frog, jump!
 by Robert Kalan ; pictures by Byron Barton.
  Book Jacket
1973
The little red hen
 Paul Galdone.
  Book Jacket
 
1956
Millions of cats
Book Jacket   book by Wanda Gág.
2003
Miss Polly has a dolly
Book Jacket   retold by Pamela Duncan Edwards ; illustrated by Elicia Castaldi.
School Library Journal Copyright Reed Business Information, a division of Reed Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved. 9780399238574 PreS-Gr 1-A traditional street chant has been given an expanded lyric and music in this picture book. Each page has one line of rhyme that dances and stretches across the page. Children will have lots of fun as they sing, chant, and clap along with the rhythmic text. "Miss Polly has a dolly who is sick, sick, sick/She calls for the doctor to come quick, quick, quick!" Music and lyrics appear on the front and back endpapers, along with finger-play motions. Paint, collage, and computer graphics create simple figures and lots of patterns, all in a palette of light blues, yellows, and greens with splashes of primary color. The text swirls and curves over the page with lines and small drawings that suggest a small child's doodling. Perfect for storytime, this title can be read aloud as a story, sung or chanted with a group, or simply shared between adult and child.-Jane Marino, Bronxville Public Library, NY Copyright 2003 Reed Business Information.
Publishers Weekly Copyright Reed Business Information, a division of Reed Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved. 9780399238574 This catchy song, whose musical notation is given as an endpaper bonus, explains that "Miss Polly has a dolly who is sick, sick, sick/ She calls for the doctor to come quick, quick, quick!" In her foreword, Edwards (Some Smug Slug) recalls skipping rope to the rhyme, and now feels the need to give it closure ("I was always puzzled by the fact that we never knew if Miss Polly's dolly recovered from her illness," she writes). Here, pink-cheeked Miss Polly worriedly watches a frowning, yellow-faced doll in a pea-green dress. Her physician, a boy who rides a red tricycle and wears blue scrubs, listens to the doll's heart with his stethoscope and writes "1 pill for dolly" on a scrap of paper. Miss Polly offers a button-size blue pill, marked with a big "P," to the sad-faced doll, who takes a nap and wakes up smiling. In the slightly awkward closing couplets, the doctor pronounces the doll "fit, fit, fit": " `Miss Polly,' says the doctor with a great big beam/ `Let's take the dolly out for... ice cream, cream, cream!' " Castaldi, making her children's debut, creates loose collages of paper scraps, photos and crayony lines, ? la Vladimir Radunsky or Lauren Child. She gives the doll some concerned nursery friends like a stuffed pig and rubber duck. Unfortunately, this playground verse comes across as an unironic encounter between a conventionally male doctor and housewifely mom-sprightly but strangely old-fashioned. Ages 3-6. (Oct.) Copyright 2003 Reed Business Information.
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1996
My little sister ate one hare
Book Jacket   by Bill Grossman. Ill. by Kevin Hawkes.
 
1984
The Napping House Storytelling Set
 [book told and illustrated by Audrey Wood].
Book list From Booklist, Copyright American Library Association. Used with permission. 9780152567088 The simple cumulative text contrasts with the visual complexity of this beautifully designed book. From beginning to end the illustrations extend and enhance the mood of the story.
Book list From Booklist, Copyright American Library Association. Used with permission. 9780152567088 Ages 3-6. Glowing colors and changing perspectives heighten the effect of a frisky flea when it blithely disturbs--with just one bite--the slumbering occupants of the napping house.
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  Book Jacket
2009
Rhyming dust bunnies
 by Jan Thomas.
Publishers Weekly (c) Copyright PWxyz, LLC. All rights reserved 9781416979760 "We rhyme all the time!" declares one of four googly-eyed dust bunnies, ebullient in their palette of bright solid colors and Smurf-like bodies. Three of the shaggy critters promptly strut their stuff, reeling off words that rhyme with "car." But the fourth shouts, "Look!" Is he just a dimwit, or could he know something the others don't? The silly, eager-to-please dust bunnies occupy most of the space on the square pages; the silliness, the scale and large dialogue balloons combine for a party-hearty mood. Although a little sketchier than Thomas's previous works, such as What Will Fat Cat Sit On?, this book is just as funny and snappy-looking. Ages 3-5. (Jan.) (c) Copyright PWxyz, LLC. All rights reserved
School Library Journal (c) Copyright 2010. Library Journals LLC, a wholly owned subsidiary of Media Source, Inc. No redistribution permitted. 9781416979760 PreS-Gr 2-"We are Ed, Ned, Ted.and Bob. We rhyme all the time!" If children can't guess from the names, they can certainly tell from the facial expressions on these four large-nosed floppy-eared hairy blobs that Bob is the odd bunny out. When Ed (electric green and unflappably cheery) calls out, "What rhymes with bug?" Ned (purple, beige nose bigger than Ed's) yells "hug." Ted (crimson, big big yellow nose) shouts "rug." Bob, a lovely shade of turquoise but perpetually perplexed and anxious, contributes "Look out!" "'No, Bob,' scolds Ed. 'Look out!' does not rhyme with bug!" When, a few pages later, Bob's rhyme for dog is "Look out! Here comes a big scary monster with a broom!" readers' suspicions will be confirmed that Bob is more than a dust bunny with a rhyming deficiency. But Thomas doesn't simply fulfill children's expectations. True to form, she adds funny and thrilling surprises up to the absorbing end of the tale. This book will make readers laugh; it will teach them to rhyme; it will enchant them and make them think twice every time they see a vacuum cleaner.-Susan Weitz, formerly at Spencer-Van Etten School District, Spencer, NY (c) Copyright 2010. Library Journals LLC, a wholly owned subsidiary of Media Source, Inc. No redistribution permitted.
Book list From Booklist, Copyright American Library Association. Used with permission. 9781416979760 Three dust bunnies, Ed, Ned, and Ted, rhyme all the time. They say that far, jar, and tar rhyme with car, but a fourth dust bunny, Bob, just does not seem to get it; he says, Look! When they try and teach him that rug, hug, and mug rhyme with bug, he says, Look out! Of course, the smug majority is wrong. Bob's warnings come true and when a broom and then a vacuum cleaner prove him right, the rhyming trio ask Bob what rhymes with How do we get out? With thick black lines and neon colors, the dust creatures on the bright colored pages look like the huge monsters they think they are--until the big, powerful human tools take over. Preschoolers will recognize how it feels to be big but just a mite in a grown-up world, and they will enjoy the playful rhymes and simple wordplay as much as the bold scenarios of the tiniest creatures in danger from giants, and one hero who sees it coming.--Rochman, Hazel Copyright 2009 Booklist
Book list From Booklist, Copyright American Library Association. Used with permission. 9781416979760 Three dust bunnies, Ed, Ned, and Ted, rhyme all the time. They say that far, jar, and tar rhyme with car, but a fourth dust bunny, Bob, just does not seem to get it; he says, Look! When they try and teach him that rug, hug, and mug rhyme with bug, he says, Look out! Of course, the smug majority is wrong. Bob's warnings come true and when a broom and then a vacuum cleaner prove him right, the rhyming trio ask Bob what rhymes with How do we get out? With thick black lines and neon colors, the dust creatures on the bright colored pages look like the huge monsters that they think they are--until the big, powerful human tools take over. Preschoolers will recognize how it feels to be just a mite in a grown-up world, and they will enjoy the playful rhymes and simple wordplay as much as the bold scenarios of the tiniest creatures in danger from giants, and one hero who sees it coming.--Rochman, Hazel Copyright 2009 Booklist
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  Book Jacket
1993
The jacket I wear in the snow
 by Shirley Neitzel ; pictures by Nancy Winslow Parker.
  Book Jacket
 
2007
The very hungry caterpillar
Book Jacket   by Eric Carle.
Publishers Weekly (c) Copyright PWxyz, LLC. All rights reserved 9780399247453 Author-illustrator Eric Carle narrates his own classic tale The Very Hungry Caterpillar in a new, oversize board book-with-CD edition. (Philomel, $14.99 ages 1-up ISBN 978-0399-24745-3; Apr.) (c) Copyright PWxyz, LLC. All rights reserved
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