Reviews for Chanticleer and the fox

Horn Book
(c) Copyright The Horn Book, Inc., a wholly owned subsidiary of Media Source, Inc. No redistribution permitted.

Fiction: PB The classic tale about Reynard the Fox giving the rooster a proper comeuppance is captured in a less than adequate retelling and illustrated with vintage characters from the Disney archives. Horn Rating: Marginal, seriously flawed, but with some redeeming quality. Reviewed by: sl (c) Copyright 2010. The Horn Book, Inc., a wholly owned subsidiary of Media Source, Inc. No redistribution permitted.


Book list
From Booklist, Copyright © American Library Association. Used with permission.

Ages 5-9. Jaunty art from the Disney archives graces every page in Roberts' sprightly retelling of a well-known Chaucerian tale. Chanti~c~leer, his cockiness en~hanced by the mistaken impres~sion that his crowing makes the sun rise as well as by the admiration of the hens, runs for mayor. His elec~tion turns him into a nagging task~master, who demands that the hens produce more and more eggs. Thus, when sneaky Reynard enters the vil~lage, the frazzled hens are only too happy to respond to the fox's atten~tion. He easily gains their support when he decides to oppose Chanti~cleer in the next election. His pride and anger aroused, the rooster challenges Senor Poco Loco, Reynard's friend and an undefeated dueler, to a duel. Just at the crucial moment, Chanti~cleer is saved by the village police dog. The fox escapes, and Chanti~cleer announces a whole~some balance between work and play for the hens.~~ The cartoon-style line and color wash drawings reveal the spunky and energetic characters with panache, and the message won't be lost on young readers. A guarant~eed hit and a great read-aloud. ~--Deborah Abbott


School Library Journal
(c) Copyright Library Journals LLC, a wholly owned subsidiary of Media Source, Inc. No redistribution permitted.

K-Gr 3-- Chanticleer may be a pompous old bird who needs to be taught a lesson , but he certainly never deserved such a misconceived picture book as this one. The illustrations and text are both lackluster and feeble. Missing are any touches of Chaucer's ribald tone and implicit violence or the lyrical charm of Cooney's Caldecott Medal picture book (Crowell, 1961). What this version has instead are Reynard's convoluted plans to defeat Chanticleer as mayor and a duel between Chanticleer and the notorious rooster, Senor Poco Loco (who is depicted just as stereotypically as his name implies). The illustrations, taken from a backlog of Disney storyboards that never saw the light of completion, are executed in pen-and-ink with watercolor washes and, like a good storyboard should, describe the action in a broad manner. However, storyboards do not make good picture books. Objects are suspended in air and figures jump, stand, and even juggle without benefit of a background. The page design is crowded with a cramped type style. And probably the cheapest shot of all is using the same illustration for both the first and last page. Overlook this tacky attempt and track down additional copies of Cooney's version. For more background on the character of Reynard, look to Selina Hastings's excellent Reynard the Fox (Tambourine, 1991), illustrated with Graham Percy's accomplished and delightful colored-pencil drawings. --Denise Anton Wright, Illinois State University , Normal (c) Copyright 2010. Library Journals LLC, a wholly owned subsidiary of Media Source, Inc. No redistribution permitted.

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