JavaScript must be enabled on your browser for this PAC to work properly.

Appomattox Regional Library & PETERSBURG Public Library
A.P. Hill Library  ARL - Bookmobile  Burrowsville Library  Carson Caboose  Carson Depot Library  Dinwiddie Historical Society Library  Dinwiddie Library
Disputanta Library  Hopewell Main Library  McKenney Library  Petersburg Central Library  Rodof Sholom Library  Rohoic Library
Home Calendar Reference FAQ Kid's Catalog News & Weather Directory Dictionary
Search our Catalog:

For enhanced searching options click on one of the following buttons.

Refine searching to obtain more precise results.

Expand searching by viewing results alphabetically/numerically.

Search titles, authors, subjects and or notes simultaneously.

Get assistance on using the catalog.

Renew items, check your account and holds.


Youve Got Murder

by Donna Andrews

Publishers Weekly In a detour from her first three outings featuring the delightful Meg Langslow (Revenge of the Wrought-Iron Flamingos, etc.), Andrews pulls her quirky new sleuth, Turing Hopper, from cyberspace. Turing, named for AI pioneer Alan Turing, is an AIP Artificial Intelligence Personality and the star of a vast number of research programs housed at Universal Library (UL) in Crystal City outside Washington, D.C. Turing's personalized banter with her customers is so down to earth she seems almost real, and she herself begins to believe she's becoming sentient. When her programmer, Zach Malone, mysteriously disappears, Turing suspects foul play and explores every avenue within her capabilities to find him. Needing human aid, she asks Tim Pincoski, UL's "Xeroxcist," and Maude Graham, secretary to a UL executive, for help. Programming an investigation takes Turing beyond her limited form and all three into corporate espionage, danger and murder. UL surveillance cameras are everywhere, and Turing's capacity to invade files and data in almost every area scarily evokes Big Brother. Without a doubt, this is a unique effort executed with great skill. The high-tech investigation, Turing's plan for herself and her ruminations about becoming almost human are sure to engage computer buffs everywhere. Fans looking for the lighthearted, humorous romps of the author's earlier books, however, may be disappointed. (Apr. 2) Forecast: Blurbs from the disparate likes of biographer Daniel Stashower, regionalist Earlene Fowler and Edgar-winner Steve Hamilton should help propel this unusual entry from Agatha and Anthony awards-winner Andrews onto genre bestseller lists. The loss of some cozy readers could be more than made up for by a crossover boost from SF fans at home with computer technology. Copyright 2002 Cahners Business Information.

Copyright Reed Business Information, a division of Reed Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

Powered by: YouSeeMore © The Library Corporation (TLC) Top of Page