JavaScript must be enabled on your browser for this PAC to work properly.


Cool Reads for Hot Days
Catalog Home
Catálogo En Español
About Our Library
Branches & Hours
Ninety Six Branch Library
Ware Shoals Community Library
Digital Library
Computer Classes
Computer Use & Internet Access
Auditorium Policy
Conference Room Policy
Find us on Facebook!
Identity Theft-SC
Volunteer Program
Friends of the Library
Books 2 Go Bookstore
Calendar of Events
Building Green
Adult Literacy/ESL
Ask Us!
Job Search Guide
Small Business Resources
Homework Help
Databases
Genealogy/Local History
Children's Events
Teen Scene
Library Book Discussions
Book Club Kits
Interlibrary Loan
Reference Links
Buy A Brick
Hot Titles
News & Weather

Greenwood County Library
Search our Catalog:

Search |  Browse |  Combination |  Help |  My Account  |  Email the Librarian  |  Dictionary


How to Live OR a life of Montaigne in One Question and Twenty

by Sarah Bakewell

Publishers Weekly Bakewell's biography of Michel de Montaigne (1533-1592), the French nobleman and father of the exploratory, free-floating essay, departs from chronology to present his life through questions and answers ("How to Live? Don't Worry About Death" and "Be Convivial: Live with Others") that consider "the man and writer" as well as the "long party"-the "accumulation of shared and private conversation over four hundred years." The author, a British book curator and cataloguer, begins with Montaigne's near-death after a fall from a horse, then traces back to his Latin education, his years in public service, his friendship with Etienne de La Boetie, his exploration of Hellenic philosophies, and his topics that would resonate with later Renaissance scholars and general readers alike. Blakewell (The Smart) enlivens Montaigne's hometown, 16th-century Bordeaux, with a wit that conveys genuine enchantment with her subject. Montaigne preferred biographers who tried to "reconstruct a person's inner world from the evidence." Blakewell honors that perspective by closely examining his writings as well as the context in which they were created, revealing one of literature's enduring figures as an idiosyncratic, humane, and surprisingly modern force. Illus. (Oct.) Copyright 2010 Reed Business Information.

(c) Copyright PWxyz, LLC. All rights reserved

LS2Kids
Powered by: YouSeeMore © The Library Corporation (TLC) Catalog Home Top of Page